Asia Program

Events

Will Karachi Become the Next Waziristan?

Urban militancy is rising in Pakistan--and the troop drawdown in Afghanistan will likely make Pakistani cities even more violent, argues Michael Kugelman in his latest article for Foreign Policy.

Asia’s Scramble for Africa: Who Woos Best?

A new scramble for Africa is unfolding. But it’s no longer Western powers vying for land and the continent’s wealth as they had until the outbreak of World War I. The power struggle now is among Asian nations, most notably China and Japan.

Riaz Testifies Before Committee on Foreign Affairs

Public Policy Scholar Aliz Riaz spoke before the Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific on November 20th regarding the upcoming elections in Bangladesh.

Michael Kugelman and Sue Levenstein's Op-Ed Feature in World Politics Review

According to the United Nations, 74 million acres of farmland in the developing world were acquired by foreign governments and investors over the first half of 2009 -- an amount equal to half of Europe's farmland. These land deals, argue Michael Kugelman and Susan L. Levenstein in a January 20 World Politics Review op-ed, leave immense carbon footprints and threaten widespread environmental destruction.

Hunger Pains: Pakistan's Food Insecurity

Seventy-seven million Pakistanis are going hungry, and 45 million are malnourished. Weather, resource shortages, and conflict all intensify Pakistan's food insecurity. This new publication examines Pakistan's food woes from a variety of angles.

An Optimist’s Hope Begins to Fade

In this op-ed from The Dawn, Michael Kugelman writes that while he tends to be an optimist about Pakistan, he fears that the nation's perils are too ingrained and structural to be expunged by even the most exceptional of leaders.

Wilson Center Awards Inaugural Pakistan Scholarship

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, in collaboration with the Fellowship Fund for Pakistan (FFFP), a charitable trust based in Karachi, today announced the appointment of Dr. Ayesha Siddiqa as the Wilson Center's inaugural Pakistan scholar. Dr. Siddiqa will spend nine months in residence at the Wilson Center, carrying out research and writing on a project titled "Military Inc.: The Political Economy of Militarization in Pakistan."

Taiwan's Energy Conundrum

This Special Report explores the complex set of opportunities and challenges inherent in Taiwan’s energy profile. Ssu-li Chang describes the profile, and also considers the possible impact of changed pricing mechanisms and increased reliance on nuclear energy. Herng-Shinn Hwang, outlines the promise of alternative “green” energies. Chi-yuan Liang surveys Taiwan’s energy security, comparing Taiwan’s performance in energy usage with major nations around the world. And Hongyi Lai examines the possibility of energy cooperation and the potential consequences on the island’s energy supply of conflict between Taiwan and mainland China.

Competition for Japan Scholars

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is seeking Japanese Scholars for the Wilson Center Japan Scholar Program. Successful applicants will spend up to one year in residence at the Woodrow Wilson Center, in the heart of Washington, D.C., where they will carry out advanced, policy-oriented research and writing designed to bridge the gap between the academic and policy communities. The length of the Japan Scholar’s appointment will be determined according to his or her own needs and the Wilson Center’s available resources. The minimum period of residence for the Japan Scholar program is three months.

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