Asia Program

Events

Going Global: Chinese Oil and Mining Companies and the Governance of Resource Wealth

Senior Scholar Jill Shankleman conducted a six-month research project to examine the impact of China's oil and mining companies' overseas expansion on the governance of resource wealth.

Wilson Center Awards Pakistan Scholarship

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Fellowship Fund for Pakistan are pleased to announce the 2009-10 competition for the Wilson Center's Pakistan Scholar Program. One Pakistan Scholar, either from Pakistan or of Pakistani origin, will be selected each year. Successful applicants will spend 9 months in residence at the Woodrow Wilson Center, in the heart of Washington, D.C., where they will carry out advanced, policy-oriented research and writing. This scholar program is made possible by generous financial support provided by the Fellowship Fund for Pakistan (FFFP), a charitable trust based in Karachi.

Competing Visions For East Asia

The United States' re-balance or "pivot" to Asia reflects a recognition that much of the history of the 21st century will be written in Asia. The Wilson Center's Asia Program closely follows political, diplomatic, economic, and security developments in the region, and will use these pages to provide context, present conflicting perspectives, and stimulate discussion and debate on many of the most significant issues touching on U.S. interests in East Asia and the Pacific.

Special Reports

Asia Program Special Reports include papers and presentations by guest speakers at seminars and conferences sponsored by the Asia program. The Special Reports aim to make the Asia Program's discussion available to a broader audience. A hard copy of any publication may be obtained free of charge by contacting the Asia Program. Views expressed in the Special Reports do not necessarily reflect the views of the Woodrow Wilson Center. Click on the attachment for a free PDF version.

Pakistan and Afghanistan: Losing the Blame Game on Militancy

Islamabad and Kabul need to stop bickering and start cooperating on a coordinated counterterrorism strategy, argues Wilson Center Global Fellow Huma Yusuf in a new commentary written exclusively for the Asia Program website.

India and the US Pivot to Asia

The US strategic plan is to continue providing global security with emphasis on “rebalance toward the Asia-Pacific region.” Such a pivot is not new, but has been in play since the end of the Cold War, argues Robert M. Hathaway, director of the Asia Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. The strategy requires a long-term partnership with India, as an economic and security anchor in the region. Priorities for both countries vary, particularly in regard to China, leading to divisions within each country as well. Many in India do not want their nation to take part in any Sino-American cold war or conflict and accuse the US of ignoring shenanigans from Pakistan. Indians are also wary about US plans to withdraw troops from Afghanistan and the likely resulting chaos. Both countries have conservatives who oppose reliance on partnerships and agreements that could constrain their military. Ultimately, Hathaway concludes, strength of nations as global actors depends on ensuring economic security and meeting domestic challenges. – YaleGlobal

Wilson Center Awards Japan Scholarship to Satoshi Ikeuchi

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars announced the appointment of Satoshi Ikeuchi as a Wilson Center Japan Scholar. Ikeuchi will spend two and one-half months in residence at the Wilson Center, beginning in October 2009, working on a research project examining American Middle East policy.

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