Asia Program

Events

Wilson Center Awards 2012-13 Pakistan Scholarship

The Wilson Center in collaboration with the Fellowship Fund for Pakistan (FFFP), today announced the appointment of Dr. Simbal Khan as the Wilson Center's new Pakistan Scholar. Khan will spend nine months in residence at the Wilson Center beginning September 10, 2012, working on a book on U.S.-Pakistan security relations since 2001.

Getting to true democracy

Struggling with the notion of "true democracy" in the context of Pakistan's volatile politics and poor institutional base, Wilson Center 2007-08 Pakistan Scholar Samia Altaf worries about the viability of leadership,that prefers loyalty and respectability over specific skills and qualifications. Recruitment of competent candidates, based on merit and equality, Dr. Altaf suggests, will help build institutions that sustain democracy.

Goto Speaks at MEDays Forum

Northeast Asia associate Shihoko Goto discussed the challenges facing East Asia at the annual MEDays Forum in Tangier, Morocco, last week.

Stephen Tankel Discusses the Indian Mujahideen

South Asia security specialist Stephen Tankel spoke with the Asia Program about his report, Jihadist Violence: The Indian Threat, the Indian Mujahideen, and their ties to other organizations.

Japan's Vision For East Asia

As questions about U.S. commitment to its rebalance to the Asia-Pacific region remain, how Japan sees its own role in East Asia continues to evolve. The changing nature of Tokyo’s relations with Beijing and Seoul, and Japan’s internal debate about whether it should become a “normal” country with greater defense capabilities are among some key issues discussed in the Wilson Center’s latest publication.

China and the Persian Gulf

This new book, edited by program associate Bryce Wakefield and program assistant Susan L. Levenstein, examines China’s role in the Persian Gulf, evolving views on China from within the Gulf, and what China’s presence means for the United States.

Cries of Anguish: A Report on Pakistan's FATA

Pakistan's volatile Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) are too dangerous for most outsiders to access, and little information on the area leaves the region. Khalid Aziz, director of institutional capacity-building for the FATA Secretariat, screens a documentary and discusses the area's beleaguered development.

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