Asia Program

Events

Even Fake Snow Can't Disguise Real Problems in China

In this recent op-ed published by The Chicago Tribune, Timothy Hildebrandt argues that the large amount of water needed to sustain the fledgling ski industry in China is an inappropriate use of a precious and endangered resource. China should delay developing this environmentally harmful sport while it grapples with more pressing issues of human health and sustainable development. It is reprinted here with permission.

The First Visit to Burma by an American Secretary of State

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s visit last month to Burma (Myanmar) broke new ground in Washington’s often tortuous relationship with that country. Wilson Center Fellow Kenton Clymer reminds us that Clinton was not the first secretary of state to make a surprise trip to Burma. Clymer is a Distinguished Research Professor of History at Northern Illinois University.

Public Policy Scholar Marvin Ott on China's Ambitions in the South China Sea

Public Policy Scholar Marvin Ott discusses China's strategic ambitions in the South China Sea.

Clash of National Identities: China, Japan, and the East China Sea Territorial Dispute

As tensions between Japan and China continue to bubble over islands in the East China Sea, scholars from the two countries outline not only the origins, but also the policy options to resolve the territorial dispute.

Pakistan: Meeting Energy, Fiscal Needs

While in many respects a troubled country, Pakistan in recent years has experienced robust economic growth. Panelists at a recent Asia Program conference, however, speculated that underlying fiscal problems might be jeopardizing that growth.

Five Pakistani Militants We Should Be Paying More Attention To

Michael Kugelman writes about five Pakistani militant leaders who are worth singling out—not just because they threaten stability, but because they foreshadow Pakistani militancy’s future trajectory.

Completing the Asia Pivot

President Barack Obama has made “pivoting” or “rebalancing” of U.S. policies toward Asia one of his strategic priorities. The next administration must not simply maintain this policy on autopilot; it must also provide institutional structure, budgetary support, and conceptual legitimacy to the policy.

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Experts & Staff