Asia Program

Events

Christian Science Monitor: Obama and Romney Should Be Reading Senior Program Associate Michael Kugelman's New Book

Barack Obama and Mitt Romney should be reading Michael Kugelman's new book, according to the Christian Science Monitor.

Fueling the Future: Meeting Pakistan's Energy Needs in the 21st Century

This volume assesses Pakistan's energy needs over the next 25-30 years, and it seeks to foster debate on how Pakistan might succeed in meeting its energy requirements in the decades ahead. Coedited by Robert M. Hathaway, Bhumika Muchhala, and Michael Kugelman. Click on the attachment for a free PDF version.

Cooperation or Conflict: Perspectives on the South China Sea

Tensions over territorial claims continue to percolate in the South China Sea. Questions and concerns about China’s intentions and actions are hot topics in the Philippines and Vietnam. Can the U.S., given the stated intention to “rebalance to Asia,” play an important role in sorting out competing claims?

Maleeha Lodhi's Op-Ed in Pakistan's The News

In a September 30 op-ed in Pakistan's The News newspaper, Public Policy Scholar Maleeha Lodhi weighs in on the challenges facing President Obama as he considers a strategy shift in Afghanistan.

Is the Worst Yet to Come?

It suddenly seems that Bangladesh may be on the verge of repeating an older version of its history, the attempt to create a one-party authoritarian state 40 years ago, writes William Milam.

Wilson Center Seeks Japan Expert for Associate Position

The Woodrow Wilson Center's Asia Program is seeking applications from all qualified candidates for the position of Asia Program Associate, whose duties will focus on the Center's Northeast Asia programming, particularly regarding Japan. The deadline for applications has changed. It is now Friday, May 18, 2012.

Party Media Reform in China

A personal statement by Gang Lin, Asia Program associate, for a Congressional Executive Commission on China roundtable held on September 22, 2003.

Pakistan's Number One Threat

Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has repeatedly declared that his number one priority is rebuilding his country’s economy. But Wilson Center and Asia Program Public Policy Scholar Farahnaz Ispahani warns, in an article published in the Foreign Policy’s AFPAK channel, that the Sharif government may face an even more urgent task: combatting the domestic terrorism that threatens the very future of Pakistan.

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