Events

Dilma Needs Davos More Than Davos Needs Dilma

For now, Rousseff's comfortable position in opinion polls gives her space in Davos to talk about plans for fiscal tightening and economic opening, which would create confidence among investors, writes Paulo Sotero.

Energy around the Globe

The Wilson Center's Global Energy Initiative (GEI) was featured in the Wilson Center Centerpoint. Along with other programs, the GEI explores energy costs, demand, resources, and environmental ramifications in countries around the world.

Thinking Brazil 2

Brazilian Presidential Race, 2002Will Lula clear the hurdles ahead?May 2002

Brazil's Emerging Economic Power: Now Investment-Grade and Why it Matters

On April 30, 2008, Standard & Poor's became the first ratings agency to raise Brazil's foreign debt to investment-grade status. These unprecedented decisions, coupled with the discovery of massive new oil and gas reserves, boosts Brazil's prospects for continued, long-term economic and political stability. To explore the implications of Brazil's investment grade status the Brazil Institute hosted a congressional luncheon in partnership with the Wilson Center's On the Hill program.

Obama to Brazil: send us your affluent, money-spending masses

Paulo Sotero, director of the Brazil Institute, discusses Brazil's growing growing purchasing power abroad.

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff prepares for Washington visit

Paulo Sotero, director of the Brazil Institute, discusses President Dilma Rousseff's visit to Washington, D.C.

Program Assistant Position Open

The Brazil Institute is hiring a Program Assistant. The Assistant will work as the principal administrative support and research assistant to the Director of the Brazil Institute.

Agriculture and Sustainability in the State of Mato Grosso

The issues of global climate change, environmental preservation, as well as land use and food security have emerged as dominant themes on the international agenda. Nowhere is the convergence of these issues more apparent than in Brazil—a major food supplier and owner of more than 65 percent of the Amazon rain forest—and, especially, in the state of Mato Grosso. The third largest Brazilian state, Mato Grosso ,borders the southern stretches of the Amazon biome. As Brazil's leading producer of various foodstuffs, the state is at the center of a broader debate about economic development and environmental sustainability. To advance dialogue and promote effective policy that addresses these interlinked issues, the Brazil Institute convened a seminar on December 4, 2008, focused on "Agriculture and Sustainability" with the principal stakeholders.

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