Events

Webcast

Report Launch: The World’s Water, Vol. 7

October 18, 2011 // 10:00am12:00pm
Peter Gleick and colleagues find that more and more regions of the world, the United States included, may be reaching the point of “peak water.” To conserve this critical resource without harming the economy or public health, individuals are looking for new techniques in sustainable water management.
Webcast

Scrambling for Hydropower in the Himalayas

September 26, 2011 // 9:00am11:00am
The Third Pole – an area of the Himalayas and Tibetan plateau and home to the largest reserve of fresh water outside the Arctic and Antarctic – is a region familiar to both earthquakes and dam projects. This irreconcilable reality is at the center of an emerging debate, raising environmental and security concerns as regional governments scramble for clean energy resources and control over a precious water source.
Webcast

Book Launch: Water: Asia's New Battleground

September 12, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Brahma Chellaney, one of India's most prominent strategists, discusses the threat posed by water tensions in Asia.

Collaboration with Taiwan to Address Regional Environmental Challenges

August 11, 2011 // 10:30am11:30am
Come join the Wilson Center's China Environment Forum and Asia Program for a conversation with Taiwan's Minister of Environmental Protection, Dr. Stephen Shu-Hung Shen, to learn about work the EPA and Taiwan have been doing since 2010 to engage regional partners to advance global capacity in the remediation of contaminated sites, e-waste recycling and management, and reduction of air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from ports.
Webcast

Dams and Sustainability in China

July 26, 2011 // 9:00am11:00am
Dams, dams, and more dams! China is home to roughly half the world's large dams, and hydropower is set to play a key role in helping China meet its 2020 carbon intensity reduction commitments. Dozens of new large hydro projects are underway across the southwestern part of the country, where steep mountains and big rivers mean great hydro potential. Yet many of those projects are in culturally or ecologically sensitive areas that are home to large concentrations of ethnic minorities, and may involve trans-boundary rivers – all of which bring the long-term sustainability of the projects to the fore.

Averting Toxic Disasters in China

June 23, 2011 // 9:00am11:00am
Over the past several years, the Chinese news media has been more active in reporting on lead poisoning cases and cadmium contamination in food. Overall, however, the magnitude of China's toxic pollution problems is not very well understood, which hinders the search for solutions. For example, China uses and releases more mercury than any other country in the world.

Red, White, and Green? Environmental Security Threats and Sustainability Opportunities (OFFSITE)

June 10, 2011 // 7:30am9:30am
Environment and energy issues pose both threats and opportunities no matter where you sit. Leading experts discuss how two critical American actors are tackling these challenges: the business community and the U.S. military.
Webcast

Environmental Legal Advocates Pushing the Public Interest

June 09, 2011 // 9:00am11:00am
Enforcement of environmental laws has long been a major challenge in China, where severe water, air, and soil pollution problems are causing increasing health problems across the country. A new tool that lawyers and NGOs in China have begun to explore is the use of public interest law cases to push for better enforcement of pollution control regulations.

The Forgotten Renewable: Biogas

May 24, 2011 // 9:00am11:00am
China's status as number one emitter of CO2 is fairly common knowledge, but less heralded in the newspapers or global climate talks is that China's anthropogenic methane emissions are also first in the world. Methane is a greenhouse gas that is 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide. A large percentage of China's anthropogenic methane emissions come from agriculture (manure management); coal mines; landfills; and natural gas and oil systems.

Greening China's Urbanization Boom

May 16, 2011 // 10:00am12:00pm
With an average GDP rate of 10 percent for the past thirty years, China's economic boom has brought millions out of poverty and fueled a rate of urbanization that is faster than any country in human history. Between 1980 and 2008, China's urbanization rate rose from 20 to 44.9 percent, with the current urban population reaching slightly over 600 million. Buildings consume one-quarter of the China's total energy, and this fraction will expand considerably as the government pushes forward policies to urbanize another 350 million over the next twenty years.

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