Events

The Two Koreas and the Question of National Reunification, 1953-1960

April 11, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
This panel will explore the positions of the two Korea’s on the question of national reunification after the 1953 Korean War armistice until 1960, when Syngman Rhee was forced from power.

An Unwanted Visionary: Gorbachev's Unrealized Ambitions and the Soviets' Retreat from Asia

March 31, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Radchenko will offer a fresh interpretation of Mikhail Gorbachev’s foreign policy by showing how the Soviet leader tried to reshape the international order through engagement with China and India, and why his vision for a Soviet-led Asia ultimately failed. Relying on newly declassified records from Russian, Chinese and other archives, he will discuss lost opportunities and recount painful legacies of Soviet retrenchment from Asia.

A History of the Iraqi Crisis: France, the United States, and Iraq, 1991-2003

March 28, 2014 // 2:00pm4:00pm
Frédéric Bozo will speak on his new book "A History of the Iraqi Crisis: France, the United States, and Iraq, 1991-2003". Based on exclusive French archival sources and numerous interviews with former officials in both countries, Frédéric Bozo retraces the history of the international crisis that culminated in the 2003 Iraqi conflict.

South Korea's Trilateral Partnership with the U.S. and Japan

March 26, 2014 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Former National Assemblyman Dr. Jin Park asks, as South Korea under President Park Geun-hye aims to harmonize relations with China, reset its relationship with Japan, and build trust with North Korea to prepare for the national unification, what are the lessons from the Park Chung Hee era?

The Transformation of American International Power in the 1970s

March 06, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Book Launch: Barbara Zanchetta analyzes the evolution of American-Soviet relations during the 1970s, from the rise of détente during the Nixon administration to the policy's crisis and fall during the final years of the Carter presidency. This study traces lines of continuity among the Nixon, Ford, and Carter administrations and assesses its effects on the ongoing redefinition of America's international role in the post-Vietnam era.

New Evidence on the Congo Crisis and Aftermath, 1960-1968

March 04, 2014 // 9:00am12:30pm
CWIHP, in cooperation with the Office of the Historian, US Department of State, will host a symposium on FRUS Volume XXIII, Congo, 1960–1968. The newest volume in the Foreign Relations of the United States series examines US foreign policy toward Congo-Léopoldville during the administrations of Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson.

Assessing Warsaw Pact Military Forces: The Role of CIA Clandestine Reporting

January 16, 2014 // 10:00am12:00pm
"Assessing Warsaw Pact Military Forces: The Role of CIA Clandestine Reporting" examines the role of intelligence derived from clandestine human and technical sources in the Central Intelligence Agency’s analyses of Warsaw Pact military capabilities for war in Europe from 1955 to 1985.

New Approaches to Trans-Atlantic Relations in the Early Cold War

January 06, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Giuliana Chamedes and Udi Greenberg explore how European agents utilized U.S. institutions and power in order to promote their own political agendas. The panel discussion will shed new light on the ideological and political forces that helped shape U.S. diplomacy in postwar Europe.

Visions of Freedom: Havana, Washington, Pretoria, and the Struggle for Southern Africa, 1976-1991

October 23, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
During the final fifteen years of the Cold War, southern Africa underwent a period of upheaval, with dramatic twists and turns in relations between the superpowers. Americans, Cubans, Soviets, and Africans fought over the future of Angola, where tens of thousands of Cuban soldiers were stationed, and over the decolonization of Namibia, Africa's last colony. Beyond lay the great prize: South Africa.

Why Communism Did Not Collapse: Understanding Authoritarian Regime Resilience in Asia and Europe

October 03, 2013 // 2:30pm4:00pm
Martin K. Dimitrov, Associate Professor of Political Science at Tulane University, will speak on the puzzling durability of communist autocracies in Eastern Europe and Asia, the the longest-lasting type of non-democratic regime to emerge after World War I.

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