Events

Webcast

More than Just a Scourge: General de Gaulle and the Cold War

September 09, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
General de Gaulle is often remembered as the great scourge of the Western Alliance during the 1960s, the mercurial French President who launched a global and comprehensive challenge against the United States’ leadership of the Free World. But de Gaulle was driven by more than simply obstructionism or a desire to make life difficult for his American allies. Garret Martin will make the case that the General pursued an ambitious, if flawed, grand strategy during the 1960s through which he sought to overcome the Cold War bipolar order.
Webcast

2013 IFES-WWICS Washington Forum on Korea

June 14, 2013 // 9:30am3:30pm
The 2013 IFES-WWICS Washington Forum on Korea featured a keynote address by Ambassador Glyn Davies, U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy, a roundtable on leadership changes in East Asia, luncheon remarks by the Honorable Jae Kyu Park and Ambassador Ho-Young Ahn, and a panel discussion on North Korea’s crisis diplomacy.
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Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

May 08, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kate Brown presented "Plutopia", the first history of Richland, Washington and Ozersk, Russia, two communities developed in parallel by opposing nations at the height of the Cold War.

OFFSITE EVENT: Negotiating Independence: New Directions in the History of Decolonization and the Cold War

May 03, 2013 // 8:00amMay 04, 2013 // 1:30pm
The advent of decolonization, particularly after the Second World War, shares more than a chronological partnership with the Cold War. While the general economic, political, social, and ideological connections between decolonization and the Cold War have been acknowledged, a more detailed interrogation of the confluence of these two phenomena is now beginning to emerge.
Webcast

The Real North Korea: Life and Politics in the Failed Stalinist Utopia

April 26, 2013 // 9:30am11:00am
Andrei Lankov will discuss his new book, "The Real North Korea: Life and Politics in the Failed Stalinist Utopia"
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D-Archives: How Digitizing Declassified Documents Can Restore Ukraine’s National Memory and Build an Independent, Democratic Country

April 16, 2013 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Volodymyr Viatrovych, historian and former Director, Security Services of Ukraine Special State Archive Department, discussed how Ukraine’s future as an independent country and democratic society rests on the proposition that restoring the nation’s historical memory is a critically important precondition to overcome Ukraine’s Soviet past and to bring about national reconciliation.
Webcast

Celebrating the Legacy of Daniel Patrick Moynihan: The Launch of "Moynihan's Moment," a New Book by Gil Troy

April 04, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
McGill University Professor of History Gil Troy leads on expert panel on his latest book, "Moynihan's Moment: America's Fight Against Zionism as Racism" which explores the legacy of Daniel Patrick Moynihan.

The Third Side of the Cold War: Movement of the Non-aligned States, Yugoslavia and the World

April 03, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Drawing on the private document collections of two former Yugoslav ministers of foreign affairs, Tvrtko Jakovina renders an account of Tito's last years in office and the role Yugoslavia played as the leader of the Movement of the Non-aligned Countries from 1960s until 1990s.

Environmental Film Festival: 'Vision: The PORTSfuture Projects'

March 22, 2013 // 12:00pm2:00pm
The third film being hosted by the Wilson Center as part of this year's Environmental Film Festival is 'Vision: The PORTSfuture Projects,' on the decontamination and rehabilitation of one of the United States' first uranium enrichment facilities.

The Rise and Decline of the American "Empire": Power and its Limits in Comparative Perspective

March 12, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Geir Lundestad's latest book explores the rapidly growing literature on the rise and fall of the United States. Lundestad argues that after 1945 the US has definitely been the most dominant power the world has seen and that it has successfully met the challenges from, first, the Soviet Union and, then, Japan, and the European Union. Now, however, the United States is in decline: its vast military power is being challenged by asymmetrical wars, its economic growth is slow and its debt is rising rapidly, the political system is proving unable to meet these challenges in a satisfactory way. While the US is still likely to remain the world's leading power for the foreseeable future, it is being challenged by China, particularly economically, and also by several other regional Great Powers.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Laura Deal // Catalog Specialist
  • Pieter Biersteker // Editorial Assistant
  • Charles Kraus // Program Assistant
  • Evan Pikulski // Program Assistant
  • Roy O. Kim // Program Assistant
  • James Person // Deputy Director, History and Public Policy Program; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project