Events

Webcast

Reluctant Accomplice: "Good Germans" in the War of Annihilation, 1939-1942

April 07, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Konrad H. Jarausch, Lurcy Professor of European Civilization, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill will discuss his latest book entitled Reluctant Accomplice: "Good Germans" in the War of Annihilation, 1939-1942. Comprised of wartime letters written by Jarausch's father, Konrad Jarausch, a German high-school teacher of religion and history who served in a reserve battalion of Hitler's army in Poland and Russia. The book brings the letters together to tell the gripping story of a patriotic soldier of the Third Reich who, through witnessing its atrocities in the East, begins to doubt the war's moral legitimacy.
Webcast

Warsaw Pact: Wartime Statutes—Instruments of Soviet Control

April 05, 2011 // 1:00pm4:30pm
A collection of recently declassified Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) documents demonstrates that in the early 1980s the U.S. government learned quickly of new Warsaw Pact planning instruments and accurately assessed the role that the Soviet Union's Warsaw Pact allies were expected to play in a conflict in Europe.
Webcast

American Biography After the Cold War

April 04, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
What are the issues of judgment, perspective, and stance that confront historians whose subjects played a role in debates about Stalinism, McCarthyism, and Communism? In the years when the Cold War shaped perceptions, historians identified themselves with particular political positions. But what is the view toward such issues today? Is the intellectual Cold War over? Or does it still constrain our minds and our words? Lillian Hellman will serve as a case in point in this presentation with Columbia University R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History Alice Kessler-Harris.
Webcast

Ruth Fischer: A Life For and Against Communism, 1895-1961

March 24, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Mario Kessler, associate professor at the University of Potsdam, Germany will discuss Ruth Fischer's political itinerary and attempt to explain why it went to such extremes – astonishing even in the ‘Age of Extremes.'

Why There Is (Almost) No Post-Communist Christian Democracy

March 23, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Compared to their West European cousins, post-communist Christian Democratic parties are notable for their lack of success.
Webcast

Solidarity With Solidarity: Western European Trade Unions and the Polish Crisis, 1980-1982

March 11, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
On March 11, 2011 Idesbald Goddeeris will discuss his latest book which analyzes reaction to Solidarnosc in nine Western European countries and within the international trade union confederations.
Webcast

Russia's Cold War: From the October Revolution to the Fall of the Wall

March 10, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
In his latest book Jonathan Haslam makes the case that the Cold War was not stable, but was characterized by constant wars, near-wars, and political upheavals on both sides.
Webcast

Work in Progress Presentation: U.S. Policy Toward Trade Liberalization, Sino-American Economic Relations, and China's Road to "Reform and Opening," 1969-1976

February 17, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
On April 14th, 1971, President Richard Nixon announced an end to the U.S.-led embargo on the People's Republic of China, a step which marked the beginning of Sino-American economic normalization and a new direction for U.S. foreign policy despite the absence of diplomatic relations with Beijing. During a work in progress presentation, Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Dai Chaowu assessed the U.S. policy toward trade liberalization as an important element in Nixon's diplomacy and as a critical means of turning détente into a practical reality.

Offsite Film Screening: Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today

January 31, 2011 // 5:00pm8:00pm
Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today depicts the most famous courtroom drama in modern times, which is also the first set of trials to make extensive use of film as evidence, and was the first trial to be extensively documented, aurally and visually. All of the proceedings, which lasted for nearly 11 months, were recorded. Though strict limits were placed on the Army Signal Corps cameramen by the Office of Criminal Counsel. In the end, they were permitted to film only about 25 hours over the entire course of the trial. This was to prove a great impediment for writer/director Stuart Schulberg, and his editor Joseph Zigman, when they were engaged to make the official film about the trial, in 1946, shortly after its conclusion.
Webcast

Ensuring Compliance: Strategies for Popular Cooptation by the Party and State Security in Communist Europe and in Ba'thist Iraq

January 27, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
With varying degrees of success, authoritarian regimes frequently co-opt their citizens to gather information on and undermine their domestic opposition. According to Martin Dimitrov, communist Bulgaria's ability to suppress dissent was diminished from the 1970s onward because the Western-led international human rights regime forced the government to replace harsher methods it had previously used with a system of rewards for volunteer informants and reprimands for dissidents. The ineffectiveness of these tactics contributed to the regime's eventual collapse. In contrast, Joseph Sassoon explained that Iraq's Ba'th Party—unable to rely upon a superpower for support and steeled by a series of wars—was able to remain in power for thirty-five years in part because it did not relax its efforts at co-optation and repression as the regime matured.

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Upcoming Events

Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Laura Deal // Catalog Specialist
  • Pieter Biersteker // Editorial Assistant
  • Charles Kraus // Program Assistant
  • Evan Pikulski // Program Assistant
  • Roy O. Kim // Program Assistant
  • James Person // Deputy Director, History and Public Policy Program; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project