Events

After the European Elections: A Fresh Start for the EU & the Transatlantic Relationship?

May 27, 2014 // 11:00am12:30pm
Two days after 500 million citizens in the 28 EU Member States cast their vote to elect the Members of the European Parliament, what lessons can we draw from the world's second-largest exercise in democracy? The European Parliament Liaison Office with the U.S. Congress and the Global Europe Program at the Wilson Center are delighted to host an expert panel discussion on the latest state of play of the Washington-Brussels relationship.
Webcast

Arctic 2014: Who Gets a Voice and Why It Matters

May 21, 2014 // 9:00am12:00pm
Tensions over security, access, and environmental impacts in the Arctic are rising. While members of the Arctic Council (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, the United States) assert their established rights under new circumstances, an increasing number of non-Arctic states (including China, Korea, Japan, and Singapore) seek an active role in the region.
Webcast

The Roma and Human Rights: Challenges and Goals in 2014 – Lessons from the Past, Eyes to the Future

May 19, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
The Roma have been persecuted ever since their arrival from the Indian subcontinent to Europe in the 14th Century and pervasive discrimination continues towards the Roma today. Why does a people so resilient still have to endure widespread exclusion, racism and discrimination? Experts from the fields of sociology, law, politics, and history will discuss the future of the Roma, including the prospect for Roma integration in Europe and the remaining challenges for granting the Roma population full human rights. They will also address the issue of Roma rights at the local, national, EU, and international levels.
Webcast

Ukraine Between East and West

May 15, 2014 // 11:00am12:00pm
In a conversation with Wilson Center President Jane Harman, Ambassador Lamberto Zannier, Secretary General of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) will present the OSCE’s priorities for restoring stability in Ukraine and discuss the impact of the crisis on European and Euro-Atlantic security.

Contested Waters – Maritime Delimitation Issues in Southeastern Europe

May 14, 2014 // 2:00pm3:00pm
In the past two decades, Southeastern Europe has changed dramatically, leaving behind the legacy of the bloody dissolution of the former Yugoslavia and confrontations in the Aegean Sea. Five countries in the region are now members of the EU and seven are NATO members. While the Southeast European mainland is largely at peace, several issues remain and new problems have emerged in the adjacent waters of the Balkan Peninsula. From the Adriatic to the Black Sea, maritime delimitation disputes are engaging the political, diplomatic and legal communities of the countries concerned. The most recent events in Crimea may further complicate the maritime map of the Black Sea. Wilson Center Scholar Agron Alibali will discuss how the spectrum of discussions, negotiations, agreements and adjudications currently underway represents a fascinating new development for international law in general and for international law of the sea in particular in this historical part of the Mediterranean.

Great Powers, Small Wars: Asymmetric Conflict since 1945

May 13, 2014 // 10:00am11:30am
In a sophisticated combination of quantitative research and two in-depth case studies, Larisa Deriglazova surveys armed conflicts post–World War II in which one power is much stronger than the other. She then focuses on the experiences of British decolonization after World War II and the United States in the 2003 Iraq war. Great Powers, Small Wars employs several large databases to identify basic characteristics and variables of wars between enemies of disproportionate power. Case studies examine the economics, domestic politics, and international factors that ultimately shaped military events more than military capacity and strategy.
Webcast

Reagan at Reykjavik: Forty-Eight Hours that Ended the Cold War

May 08, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
In Reagan at Reykjavik: Forty-Eight Hours That Ended the Cold War, former arms control director Ken Adelman, gives readers a dramatic, first-hand account of the Reagan-Gorbachev summit -- the weekend that proved key to ending the Cold War. Based on now-declassified notes of Reagan’s secret bargaining with Gorbachev, and a front-row seat to Reykjavik and other key moments in Reagan’s presidency, Adelman gives an honest portrayal of the man at one of his finest and most challenging moments.

The Transatlantic Relationship in the Wake of Revelations about U.S. Foreign Surveillance & the Ongoing Ukrainian-Russian Crisis

May 08, 2014 // 3:00pm4:00pm
The transatlantic relationship, particularly from the German perspective, has been under great stress for almost a year due to revelations about U.S. foreign surveillance. Now the crisis with Ukraine and Russia threatens to add more strain. As voices in the U.S. and NATO call for a stronger response to Russia, Germany--with its preference for diplomatic over military instruments and its deep trade ties with Russia--is faced with hard choices. The transatlantic partnership remains crucial on these and other issues, such as the Middle East peace process, Iranian nuclear policy, and the challenge from China.

2014 Ahtisaari Symposium: The Crisis of Euro-Atlantic Security

May 05, 2014 // 9:30am2:30pm
The Ahtisaari Symposium series, established at the Wilson Center in 2010 in honor of Nobel Laureate and former Finnish President Martti Ahtisaari, addresses vital issues concerning European and transatlantic security. This year’s session will focus on The Crisis of Euro-Atlantic Security and will include remarks by President Ahtisaari and a keynote delivered by Ambassador Wolfgang Ischinger, Chairman of the Munich Security Conference and Distinguished Wilson Center Fellow.
Webcast

Into the Fold or Out in the Cold? NATO Expansion and European Security after the Cold War

May 02, 2014 // 10:00am12:00pm
Twenty years ago, the 1994 Brussels Summit marked the beginning of NATO’s post-Cold War expansion. It was a process that resonated differently on opposite sides of the former “iron curtain” in the midst of complex and evolving relations between Russia and the West. This year will be no less pivotal for European security as the crisis in Ukraine brings renewed attention to Eastern Europe and the drawdown of NATO forces in Afghanistan continues. Amid these new and ongoing challenges, NATO will hold a summit in September to chart its future course. This panel of distinguished senior officials and experts will reflect on the steps that created Europe’s current security architecture, as well as the advantages and constraints NATO will face in addressing the security challenges of the 21st century.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Kristina N. Terzieva // Program Assistant
  • Emily R. Buss // Program Assistant