Events

Explaining Nuclear Forbearance: A Case Study on Sweden

November 01, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Why did Sweden choose, in the late 1960s, to abandon its long-standing nuclear weapons plans? Today, the end of the Cold War and the declassification of large parts of the relevant documentary record, especially concerning the technical preparations for nuclear weapons production, have created the prerequisites for a more penetrating analysis of this important historical issue. The purpose of this presentation is to summarize the research on Sweden’s plans to acquire nuclear weapons based on primary sources. This overarching analysis is then tested against International Relations theories which have sought to explain factors of proliferation and non-proliferation.

Croatia and Serbia: Two New Governments, Two Sets of Challenges

October 26, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
This presentation will discuss political changes that the two new governments elected to office in Croatia in November 2011 and in Serbia in May 2012 bring to the landscape of political parties, regional cooperation and EU accession politics in South Eastern Europe.

The Risk of War: Everyday Sociality in the Republic of Macedonia

October 18, 2012 // 10:00am11:00am
Vasiliki Neofotistos discusses her recently released book, "The Risk of War: Everyday Sociality in the Republic of Macedonia," focusing on the ways middle- and working-class Albanian and Macedonian noncombatants in Macedonia's capital city, Skopje, responded to disruptive and threatening changes in social structure during the 2001 armed conflict.
Webcast

Germany and the EU: What Kind of Transatlantic Partners?

October 01, 2012 // 4:00pm5:00pm
In this Director’s Forum, Ambassador Wolfgang Ischinger, Chairman of the Munich Security Conference and Former Deputy Foreign Minister of Germany will help decode the EU and explain how the US can best use the resources offered by the Transatlantic Partnership.

Off-Site Event: On the Path to Political Power: Race and Representation in Europe and the United States

July 19, 2012 // 11:00am12:00pm
The event will address racial and ethnic minority representation in European politics, amidst changing demographics and growing tensions surrounding national identity, immigration, and terrorism.
Webcast

In Search of Arctic Energy

July 12, 2012 // 9:00am12:00pm
As traditional oil supplies dwindle across the globe, demand for Arctic energy will increase exponentially. In order to navigate the numerous Arctic challenges, energy companies must assess community impact, social issues, local benefits and concerns in addition to applying the latest technology to reduce the environmental risks to ensure the productive and responsible extraction of Arctic energy resources.
Webcast

Legal Culture and Anti-Corruption Reform: Preliminary Findings of National Survey and Focus Groups Data

June 14, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
As Serbia, Macedonia and Kosovo aim to harmonize their laws with the European Union, little is known about their legal culture and the extent to which European legal transfers are accepted in these countries. Using nationally representative surveys, focus groups, and in-depth interviews in Serbia, Macedonia and Kosovo, this research project maps legal cultures in these countries and investigates the limits of anti-corruption reform.
Webcast

Transatlantic Relations in the 21st Century

June 12, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Neither the U.S. nor Europe can afford to believe that the oft-heralded "rise of the Rest" in the 21st century must necessarily erode transatlantic relations. Current grand strategic shifts rather afford a precious opportunity to parse through the archaic vs. stubbornly indispensable facets of U.S.-European relations: and indeed to mitigate the excessive narrative of a "hegemonic transition" away from the West.
Webcast

The End of Multiculturalism in Europe? Migrants, Refugees and their Integration

May 24, 2012 // 9:00am3:00pm
In spite of the economic need for migrant labor and a tradition of embracing multi-culturalism, European electorates and their representatives in government have moved away from the more liberal and inclusive policies of the past. Some European leaders have even pronounced the “end of multiculturalism.”
Webcast

Regional Security Complex Theory and Turkish Foreign Policy: NATO Missile Shield, Eurasian Energy Politics and the Arab Spring

May 03, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Turkish foreign policy is coming under increasing scrutiny since the election of the ruling Justice and Development Party in 2002. Critiques state that Turkish foreign policy is becoming 'neo-Ottoman' or 'Islamist', arguing that Turkey is moving closer to the Middle East than Europe. The underlying hypothesis of Hamid Akin Unver's lecture however, argues that Turkey's foreign policy is not becoming more Islamist; it is becoming more British, following a pattern of external affairs in which identity is becoming increasingly more pronounced. By focusing on three case studies: Turkey’s self-appointed role as an energy hub between Europe and Russia, its role in NATO and its recent installation of the missile defense shield, and finally, its changing stance against Iran and Syria following the Arab Spring, the lecture will discuss how identity (as it relates to the narratives of history and culture) shape Turkey’s foreign policy understanding and patterns of cooperation and conflict.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Emily R. Buss // Program Assistant