Events

335. Religious Freedoms and Islamic Revivalism: Some Contradictions of American Foreign Policy in Southeast Europe

May 2007 - Religion was one of the most strictly controlled elements of everyday life under the 45 years of communist rule in Bulgaria. The 1949 Law of Religious Denominations gave the state broad powers over the spiritual life of its citizens. The Bulgarian Communist Party promoted a Marxist atheist ideology, which held that communist subjects would abandon their faith as the living standards of the workers and peasants were improved through the marvels of the command economy. Religious education was largely banned and foreign religious exchanges were prohibited. The official clergies of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church and the Bulgarian Muslim denomination were infiltrated by Communist Party members who mobilized religious discourses to solidify support for the centralized state. In the case of Islam, traditional clothing, burial practices and circumcision were outlawed, and Bulgaria's Muslims were forced to trade their Turko-Arabic names in for Slavic ones.

Unfinished Business - "The Western Balkans and the International Community"

European Studies Senior Associate Nida Gelazis to speak at a book discussion Unfinished Business - "The Western Balkans and the International Community." The event is part of a two-day South East European Economic Forum hosted by Center for Transatlantic Relations SAIS, Johns Hopkins University, Washington DC.

2009 Ion Ratiu Democracy Lecture Awardee Adam Michnik published by IP Global

2009 Ion Ratiu Democracy Lecture Awardee Adam Michnik recently published an essay for IP Global entitled "Annus Mirabilis," which deals with the events of 1989 and the development of democracy in Eastern Europe over the past twenty years.

15. The United States and Its Unknown Role in the Adriatic Conflicts of 1918-21

The activities of the United States Army and Navy in the Adriatic following the end of World War I remain largely unknown. From November 1918 to September 1921, US naval and army units controlled a wide territory along the eastern Adriatic coast, including islands, stretching from Istria to Montenegro. Their presence offers us an attractive opportunity to study the military and naval, as well as political and psychological, aspects of the dispute which emerged because of Italian claims to the eastern coast.

Crossing the Green Line

Article, Vanguard

154. Hungary's Upcoming Elections; Political Prospects & The Economic Dimension

February 1998 - In May 1998, Hungary's third, free, parliamentary election will be held. Hungary's first free election in 1990 changed the political system, and the former Communists lost. In 1994, Hungarians voted for a change in the government, and the post-Communists won. This year, the major question facing voters is the composition of the next government coalition. To understand the present political situation, it is helpful to analyze the results of the recent public surveys.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Kristina N. Terzieva // Program Assistant
  • Emily R. Buss // Program Assistant