Events

European Studies Welcomes Title VIII Research Scholar Dr. Susan C. Pearce

European Studies is pleased to welcome research scholar Susan Pearce, who will be in residence at the Center from May 7 until August 17, 2012 working on a project titled, “Gender-Based Violence, Eastern Europe, and U.S. Immigration."

Balkan Triangle: Greece, Turkey, and Regional Security

Jan./Feb. 2001 - As the two most strategically important Balkan countries, Greece and Turkey have important roles to play in promoting security, reconstruction, and international integration throughout Southeastern Europe. While Athens and Ankara maintain serious, long-term disputes over Cyprus and the Aegean, the "Central Balkan" region provides a valuable opportunity for cooperation and complementarity that can increase the influence and prestige of both states while enhancing their bilateral relations.

The Fifth Annual Ion Ratiu Democracy Lecture

Adam Michnik, a political activist and retired member of Poland's first democratic parliament, was presented the 2009 Ion Ratiu Democracy Award on December 3 at the Woodrow Wilson Center. At the event, Michnik delivered year's Ion Ratiu Democracy Lecture: Democracy: Traps and Question Marks.

39. Baltic Options: Ethnic Rivalry or Regional Cooperation?

These four papers analyze evolving patterns in the Baltics with regard to ethnic relations. The authors examine considerations for Baltic unity, as well as issues specific to the three countries. In Estonia, the author considers the effect of the country's declaration of independence on ethnic and economic stability. Another author discusses issues of nationhood in Latvia in 1993, while the final author examines the role of Russians in Lithuania.

178. U.S. Policy In The Balkans: Federation as Exit Strategy

Critics of American involvement in Kosovo generally charge that the United States has no business entering yet another bloody Balkan quarrel and that, if we did, we would never get out. Such fears are hardly groundless. An intervention undertaken without at least some agreement among the parties about long-term political objectives and without sufficient force to meet likely challenges on the ground could well end up the worst of all outcomes. It might well fail to stop the bloodshed among the parties. It could also produce significant casualties among the intervention troops. Unlike Bosnia in 1995, both sides in Kosovo still have the will to attempt to prevail by force.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Kristina N. Terzieva // Program Assistant
  • Emily R. Buss // Program Assistant