Events

Country Updates

All papers, commentaries, programs and related content prior to January 2005 reflect the work and product of the Western Policy Center. Country Updates were offered as a concise review of major political, economic, and military developments impacting U.S. interests. The dates covered 1998 - 2004 for each area of concentration that the Western Policy Center covered.

279. Leading the Way to Regionalization in East Central Europe: An Evaluation of Poland's Territorial and Administrative Reforms

October 2003 - In 1998, elections were held in Poland to create regional councils. Soon afterwards, similar elections were held in the Czech Republic (2000) and Slovakia (2002). This trend invites many questions: Why have these East Central European countries established regions and regional political authorities? What factors drove this process of region-building? What explains variance in region-building across post-communist countries? Why has Poland taken the first and the most significant steps toward regionalization? My approach to answering these questions is to consider a number of factors and incentives that drive the regional reform processes in post-communist countries in general and to examine the Polish case in particular.

The U.S. Department of State issues a statement regarding the recent violence in Bahrain

The State Department issued a statement on behalf of Nabeel Rajab, 2011 Ion Ratiu Democracy Award recipient and leading Bahraini human rights activist who was beaten by government forces in the capital of Manama last week.

"NATO and Europe in the 21st Century: New Roles for a Changing Partnership"

July 2000 Conference Report - The Wilson Center's East European Studies and West European Studies programs organized this day-long conference on April 19, 2000. The conference conducted a comprehensive examination of the NATO-Europe partnership and its future prospects, as well as an analysis of the implications of the Bosnian and Kosovo wars for NATO and for the new and aspiring members of the NATO alliance and the European Union (EU). The goal of the conference was to provide a comprehensive view of the West's key integrative institutions, NATO and the EU, as well as a clear summary of the evolving security picture in Europe and of America's future role in an ever-evolving NATO.

56. Comparing Clans in Hungary and Russia

Relying on the metaphors of plan and clan, this essay endeavors to show the similarities and differences in Hungarian and Russian paths and will evaluate the starting points, factors, processes and outcomes of post-communist transformation in Hungary and Russia. Focusing on clientelistic privatization and corruption networks, as well as on forces countervailing clandestine relationships, the author argues that whereas “clans for market” proved to be an accurate description of Hungary’s development, this interpretation is hardly applicable to Russia. The Russian-style clans endangered market building and prepared the reemergence of “clans for plan.” The following discussion will address what these opposite trajectories may mean for Hungary and Russia, as well as for the world at large.

Remember the Balkans

Lost in the current preoccupation with Iraq is that two long-festering ethnic and political crises remain unresolved in the Balkans: Bosnia and the one-time Serbian province of Kosovo.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Kristina N. Terzieva // Program Assistant
  • Emily R. Buss // Program Assistant