Events

351. Where is Serbia Going?

June 2008 - Slobodan Milosevic was removed from office in October 2000, after a historic election which he lost to the Democratic Opposition of Serbia (DOS) candidate Vojislav Kostunica. For the past eight years, Serbia has been muddling through its transition from being an international pariah state with a controlled economy—a society isolated from the rest of the world, burdened with its past and suffering from virulent nationalism—to a modern European state with a market economy and thriving democracy.

23rd Annual Junior Scholars' Training Seminar

We are pleased to announce that the 23rd JSTS meeting was held at the Aspen Wye Woods Conference center in Maryland from August 13 to 16, 2010. This meeting brings young scholars (MA or higher) together with mentors to review their work and help build their careers in the field of East European Studies. This annual training program is funded by Title VIII, the U.S. Department of State's Program for Research and Training on Eastern Europe and the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union and co-sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research (NCEEER). JSTS offers junior scholars the opportunity to present their research to a multi-disciplinary group of their peers as well as a distinguished group of senior scholars in a series of informal sessions. Junior scholars also have access to senior scholars for one-on-one discussions of their research, advice on academic and non-academic job searches and publishing. JSTS alumni pool includes more than 300 scholars, many of whom continue to play integral roles in the field of East European studies.

Peacebuilding and Statebuilding in the Horn of Africa

On April 10, H.E. Pekka Haavisto visited the Wilson Center to engage in conversation about inclusive development in post-conflict contexts, particularly focusing upon the Horn of Africa.

Fighting Organized Crime and Terrorism for Security and Stability in the Balkans

September 2000- The following was excerpted from remarks made by the minister at a Policy Forum in Washington organized by the Western Policy Center.

33. Romania's Unfinished Revolution

From the moment the megalomaniac "Great Leader" Nicolae Ceausescu, who turned his onetime maverick country into the new basket case of Europe, was overthrown, Romania became a special case again. It has opted for neither the gradual transformation chosen by Poland and Hungary nor the "velvet" revolutions of Czechoslovakia and the now defunct German Democratic Republic; even in Bulgaria, the coup that toppled Todor Zhivkov was not violent. But in Romania, the popular uprising that led to Ceausescu's overthrow on 22 December 1989 cost 1,033 lives, inflicted heavy suffering to a further 2,198 people, and damaged buildings, some of them historically significant. This paper analyzes the role disillusionment, credibility, revisionist history, and legitimacy play in the unstable result of an unfinished revolution.

Washington Applies Full Court Press to Cyprus

Article, Zaman International

Pages

Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Kristina N. Terzieva // Program Assistant
  • Emily R. Buss // Program Assistant