Events

15. The United States and Its Unknown Role in the Adriatic Conflicts of 1918-21

The activities of the United States Army and Navy in the Adriatic following the end of World War I remain largely unknown. From November 1918 to September 1921, US naval and army units controlled a wide territory along the eastern Adriatic coast, including islands, stretching from Istria to Montenegro. Their presence offers us an attractive opportunity to study the military and naval, as well as political and psychological, aspects of the dispute which emerged because of Italian claims to the eastern coast.

Cyprus Vote Rejection Will Leave Greek Cypriots With Short Stick

International Herald Tribune (Middle East/N.Africa edition), Daily Star (Lebanon)

154. Hungary's Upcoming Elections; Political Prospects & The Economic Dimension

February 1998 - In May 1998, Hungary's third, free, parliamentary election will be held. Hungary's first free election in 1990 changed the political system, and the former Communists lost. In 1994, Hungarians voted for a change in the government, and the post-Communists won. This year, the major question facing voters is the composition of the next government coalition. To understand the present political situation, it is helpful to analyze the results of the recent public surveys.

Culture Shutdown? A Plea for Museums, Galleries, and Libraries in Bosnia and Herzegovina

"... in a matter of weeks or months, seven of Bosnia’s top national cultural institutions were likely to close their doors," wrote Susan C. Pearce, an East European Studies Title VIII-supported scholar, in an article discussing the challenges that historical preservation institutions in Bosnia and Herzegovina face today.

236. Between Hungary and Romania: The Case of the Southern Transylvania's Jews During the Holocaust

September 2001- The tragedy of the Jews of Banat and Southern Transylvania was different from that of the Jews of the Old Kingdom of Romania. The dictatorial regimes of King Carol II and Marshall Ion Antonescu did not recognize the civil rights granted by the 1923 Constitution. The Jews were discriminated against on the basis of the historical regions in which they lived. The pretexts of the authorities were that: the Jews of Transylvania did not participate in the Romanian War of Independence (deliberately ignoring the fact that in 1877 they were citizens of the Austro-Hungarian Empire); did not fight in the Balkan Wars of 1912- 1913; did not take part in the unionist propaganda; did not integrate into Romanian culture; and, many of them used Hungarian as a language of communication and culture.

Pages

Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Kristina N. Terzieva // Program Assistant
  • Emily R. Buss // Program Assistant