Events

Webcast

Cuban Missile Crisis: Nuclear Order of Battle

October 24, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Robert S. Norris, senior fellow for nuclear policy at the Federation of American Scientists will lead a Wilson Center panel discussion on "Cuban Missile Crisis: The Nuclear Order of Battle." Joining him will be defense analyst and nuclear historian David A. Rosenberg. The event will take place during the 50th anniversary of the 13 day crisis.

Foreign Relations of the United States and the Cuban Missile Crisis

October 23, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
The Cold War International History Project in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State’s Office of the Historian presents a panel discussion, Foreign Relations of the United States and the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Reform Without End: Europe’s Welfare Traditions

October 22, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Surveying Europe’s welfare traditions since 1500, in this seminar session Tom Adams will discuss characteristics of the modern European welfare state, many rooted in long-held values and centuries of experience. Profound social changes have repeatedly challenged communities to re-examine and reshape institutions and practices. The diversity of arrangements across Europe has contributed to an ongoing exchange of observation, experiment, and aspiration – in short, to reform without end.
Webcast

The Soviet Cuban Missile Crisis: Castro, Mikoyan, Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Missiles of November

October 17, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Based on secret transcripts of top-level diplomacy undertaken by the number-two Soviet leader, Anastas Mikoyan, to settle the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, this book rewrites conventional history. The "missiles of October" and "13 days" were only half the story: the nuclear crisis actually stretched well into November 1962 as the Soviets secretly planned to leave behind in Cuba over 100 tactical nuclear weapons, then reversed themselves because of obstreperous behavior by Fidel Castro. The highly-charged negotiations with the Cuban leadership, who bitterly felt sold out by Soviet concessions to the United States, were led by Mikoyan.
Webcast

The Future of American Coasts

October 15, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
America began as a coastal country, and, after a century of identifying with its heartland, is now returning to the sea demographically, economically, and culturally. Today, more of us live on coasts, but few know how to live with them in a sustainable manner. Coastal futures depend on the recovery of the oldest form of intelligent human life, homo littoralis. In this talk John Gillis will explore the ways humans have shaped shores and how shores have shaped humanity.
Webcast

Becoming Enemies: U.S.-Iran Relations and the Iran-Iraq War, 1979-1988

October 15, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
With its remarkable declassified documentation and oral testimony that bear directly on questions of U.S. policymaking with regard to the Iran-Iraq War, "Becoming Enemies" reveals much that was previously unknown about U.S. policy before, during, and after the war. The authors go beyond mere reportage to offer lessons regarding fundamental foreign policy challenges to the U.S. that transcend time and place.
Webcast

Is the World More Dangerous 50 years after the Cuban Missile Crisis?

October 15, 2012 // 1:00pm2:30pm
In October the world will observe the 50th Anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, when the world came closest to nuclear war. In this Wilson Center National Conversation, panelists will discuss the Cuban Missile Crisis and the lessons that it holds in the context of the upcoming US presidential election.

The Role of the Federal Republic of Germany in the Industrialization of the Republic of Korea during the Park Chung Hee Era

October 05, 2012 // 2:00pm3:00pm
Meung-Hoan Noh (Hankuk University of Foreign Studies) will present on the relationship between West Germany and South Korea's industrialization during the Park Chung Hee era.
Webcast

Hollywood Left and Right: How Movie Stars Shaped American Politics

October 01, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Steven Ross challenges the commonly held belief that Hollywood has always been a bastion of liberalism. The real story, he argues, is far more complicated. First, Hollywood has a longer history of conservatism than liberalism. Second, and most surprising, while the Hollywood Left was usually more vocal and visible, the Right had a greater impact on American political life, capturing a senate seat (Murphy), a governorship (Schwarzenegger), and the ultimate achievement, the Presidency (Reagan).

Thirteen Days and More: A Soviet Perspective on the Cuban Missile Crisis

September 24, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Fifty years ago, the world spent thirteen days transfixed as the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. engaged in a contest of wills over placement of Soviet missiles in Cuba. Svetlana Savranskaya will discuss behind-the-scenes maneuvers by Soviet second-in-command Anastas Mikoyan, revealing that the crisis lasted into November and involved plans by the U.S.S.R. to leave tactical nuclear weapons in Cuba, foiled not by U.S. resolve, but by Fidel Castro’s own actions.

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