Events

Why Did Russia Give Away Crimea Sixty Years Ago?

In 1954 the Soviet Union transferred control of Crimea to Soviet Ukraine. Mark Kramer (Harvard) explains the reasons behind this surprising decision, one which has come back to haunt Ukraine today with tragic consequences.

Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: It's Getting Personal

The role that nuclear weapons play in international politics and security is evolving. For wealthy, militarily powerful countries, nuclear weapons are playing a diminishing role in security planning. Conversely, some countries that lack advanced military capabilities may be coming to see nuclear weapons as increasingly important for their security. The differences between these two groups are reinforced by the fact that, over the past decade, two dictators who ended their nuclear programs have lost their regimes and their lives. As a result, authoritarian leaders may now have an increasingly personal interest in holding on to their nuclear ambitions. U.S. interests can be advanced by minimizing the association that has developed over the past decade between ending nuclear weapons programs, ending regimes, and ending authoritarian leaders’ lives.

From the Peaceful Atom to the Peaceful Explosion

NPIHP Working Paper #3. Jayita Sarkar explores technological collaboration between the French and Indian Atomic Energy Commissions, using new archival documents to expose how shared opposition to U.S. information censorship and the desire to preserve foreign policy independence fostered nuclear collaboration between the two nations.

Conference Report: The Cold War: History, Memory, and Representation

H-Soz-u-Kult has released a report on the CWIHP co-sponsored conference The Cold War: History, Memory, Representation, which was held from 14-16 July 2011 at the European Academy in Berlin.

HAPP Director Christian Ostermann is featured in the Kyunghyang Shinmun

On October 24, 2011, Kyunghyang Shinmun, a South Korean newspaper, featured a report on the publication of The Rise and Fall of Détente on the Korean Peninsula, 1970-1974, the newest addition to the History and Public Policy Critical Oral History Conference Series.

New Publication by CWIHP Senior Scholar Bernd Schaefer

Confronting the GDR's communist past was the subject of much public discourse in a Germany reunified by the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989. The federal parliament of a reunited Germany saw "a public duty to address, and possibly redress, the manifold issues of injustice and repression committed during GDR times."

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