International Security Studies

Events

Book Launch--Democracy and the Internet: Allies or Adversaries?

September 23, 2002 // 5:00am6:30pm

The Tragedy of Great Power Politics

February 10, 2002 // 11:00pm

National Missile Defense and Proliferation

March 29, 2001 // 11:00pm
Adler and Miller

Iran's Nuclear Program: Reaction to the IAEA Report

Is Iran destined to become a nuclear power? Aaron David Miller and Michael Adler weigh the options, including whether military action might succeed where sanctions and diplomacy so far failed.

Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: It's Getting Personal

The role that nuclear weapons play in international politics and security is evolving. For wealthy, militarily powerful countries, nuclear weapons are playing a diminishing role in security planning. Conversely, some countries that lack advanced military capabilities may be coming to see nuclear weapons as increasingly important for their security. The differences between these two groups are reinforced by the fact that, over the past decade, two dictators who ended their nuclear programs have lost their regimes and their lives. As a result, authoritarian leaders may now have an increasingly personal interest in holding on to their nuclear ambitions. U.S. interests can be advanced by minimizing the association that has developed over the past decade between ending nuclear weapons programs, ending regimes, and ending authoritarian leaders’ lives.

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Experts & Staff

  • Robert S. Litwak // Vice President for Scholars and Academic Relations and Director, International Security Studies
  • Tonya Boyce // Program Assistant, International Security Studies