International Security Studies

Events

The 3/11 Madrid Bombings: An Assessment After 5 Years

Conventional wisdom about the 3/11 attacks is that it was a local, isolated terrorist cell at work. But the character of the attacks suggest Islamic jihadist terrorists as more likely perpetrators, explained Fernando Reinares, director of the Program on Global Terrorism in Madrid's Elcano Royal Institute.

Dealing with the Iranian Nuclear Challenge

Although Iran’s mastery of the nuclear fuel cycle presents an inherent option for creating a bomb, the Tehran regime has no urgent incentive to build nuclear weapons. Current U.S. policy, which emphasizes coercive sanctions and diplomatic isolation to compel Iran to comply with its obligations under the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), would fall squarely under the rubric of containment, even as the term has been eschewed and delegitimized in the U.S. policy debate. As long as Iran does not overtly cross the U.S. “red line” of weaponization, U.S. policy will likely remain containment in form, if not in name.

The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo's First 100 Days

Much has been written about policymaking during the first 100 days of the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo, but little is known about what happened on the ground in Cuba. As part of International Security Studies' ongoing Terrorism and Homeland Security Forum, author Karen Greenberg discusses her book on that period.
Jane Harman on C-SPAN

Harman on US Foreign Policy

In a wide-ranging interview on C-SPAN's Washington Journal, Harman discussed transparency in counter-terrorism, the China diplomatic controversy, the private sector's role in enhancing the nation's cyber-security, and the anniversary of the death of Osama Bin Laden.

Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: It's Getting Personal

The role that nuclear weapons play in international politics and security is evolving. For wealthy, militarily powerful countries, nuclear weapons are playing a diminishing role in security planning. Conversely, some countries that lack advanced military capabilities may be coming to see nuclear weapons as increasingly important for their security. The differences between these two groups are reinforced by the fact that, over the past decade, two dictators who ended their nuclear programs have lost their regimes and their lives. As a result, authoritarian leaders may now have an increasingly personal interest in holding on to their nuclear ambitions. U.S. interests can be advanced by minimizing the association that has developed over the past decade between ending nuclear weapons programs, ending regimes, and ending authoritarian leaders’ lives.
Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War by Robert S. Litwak

Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War

Robert Litwak traces the origins and development of rogue state policy and then assesses its efficacy through detailed case studies of Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. In place of a generic and constricting strategy, he argues for the development of "differentiated" strategies of containment, tailored to the particular circumstances within individual states.

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Experts & Staff

  • Robert S. Litwak // Vice President for Scholars and Academic Relations and Director, International Security Studies
  • Tonya Boyce // Program Assistant, International Security Studies