International Security Studies

Events

Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War by Robert S. Litwak

Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War

Robert Litwak traces the origins and development of rogue state policy and then assesses its efficacy through detailed case studies of Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. In place of a generic and constricting strategy, he argues for the development of "differentiated" strategies of containment, tailored to the particular circumstances within individual states.

Debating Iran's Nuclear Aspirations

This article appeared in the Autumn 2003 issue of The Washington Quarterly.

U.S. Energy Security Policy: A Global Perspective

Making sure markets are open, fair, and transparent is a key tenet of the Obama administration's global energy security agenda. At a January 11 Director's Forum, State Department special envoy David Goldwyn outlined the United States' plan for energy security policy.

The Quarterly Report: Is Democracy Worth It?

Click here to explore the latest issue of the Wilson Center’s flagship publication, the Wilson Quarterly with the help of its editor, Steve Lagerfeld and contributors Joshua Kucera and Steve McDonald. Also Robert Litwak discusses nuclear proliferation threats to United States and global security.

Pages

Experts & Staff

  • Robert S. Litwak // Vice President for Scholars and Academic Relations and Director, International Security Studies
  • Tonya Boyce // Program Assistant, International Security Studies