Events

Deputy Director, Douglas Spelman Participates in Discussion on the VOA (Chinese) Program, "Pro and Con."

What will be the impact of the China issue on the 2012 U.S. Presidential Election? Will China become a Superpower? Deputy Director Douglas Spelman addresses these questions on a May 27, 2011 segment on VOA Chinese. Watch the discussion here! (In Chinese).

How to Prevent Accidental Conflict in the East China Sea

Since the crisis over the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands in September 2012, the area around these tiny islands has become a zone of tension with high probability of an accident and subsequent conflict. Global Fellow Zheng Wang details his proposal to avoid both.

U.S.-China Relations: Asian Perspectives

Few would question the assertion that the U.S.-China relationship is the predominant factor in Asian power interactions. All Asian capitals keep a very close eye on bilateral dealings between these two giants, in particular to see how they will affect their own relations with them.

Who Owns The Arctic Part 2: Is Sustainable Development Possible?

In part 2 of our series “Who Owns The Arctic?”, Aki Tonami discusses the prospects for protecting the environment and creating sustainable development as more and more countries turn their attention to the North Pole.

Wilson Center Inaugurates the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States

The Kissinger Institute is dedicated to Dr. Henry A. Kissinger's legacy and vision of the U.S.-China bilateral relationship. It will promote greater awareness of the relationship as well as its impact on both countries and the world.

The Next Hu

Public Policy Scholar Zheng Wang explains the system for selecting the Chinese leadership called “gedai zhidin” and how it points to Hu Chunhua as the next leader of the Chinese Communist Party after Xi Jinping.

China and Japan REALLY Don’t Like Each Other

A recent survey of Chinese and Japanese citizens views of each other’s countries found that 92.8 percent of Chinese respondents hold unfavorable views of Japan, a startling 28 percent rise from the year before. Similarly, 90.1 percent of respondents in Japan had an unfavorable or relatively unfavorable view of China, compared with 84.3 percent last year. For both countries, these figures were higher than in the previous nine annual surveys conducted.

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