Events

Latin American Program in the News: Gorilla in the Room: Guatemala Takes the Lead

Just what that means in practice is harder to say. For a deeper understanding of how Guatemala sees itself within the debate, we turn to Guatemalan Secretary of Planning Fernando Carrera. Carrera is the man who many say is the architect of Perez's proposals on drug-related issues. He recently gave a talk at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars entitled "Drug Policy and Democracy in Central America: A View From Guatemala," that provides a crucial insight into how Guatemala is positioning itself in the ever-turbulent discourse on drug legalization

Latin American Program in the News: What did Chavez leave for Maduro

This article mentioned the Cynthia Arnson’s piece on Venezuela published on PBS. “The economy in Venezuela cannot afford anymore the government working as in the Chavez period. Maduro needs to make adjustments in economic policies, especially improving the productive efficiency in the Department of Petroleum,” starts the article in Chinese. (In Chinese)

Education Reform in Colombia: The Elusive Quest for Effectiveness

This paper explores the evolving context of education reform in Colombia.

Special Report Available for Download

"The Role of the Media in the Consolidation of Democracy," a Special Report of the Latin American Program, is a result of a conference co-sponsored with the Organization of American States on November 15, 2004. Download the report from our Special Reports webpage.

Santos Says Colombia in Final Phase of Peace Talks as Sworn In

Program Director Cynthia J. Arnson is quoted in Bloomberg News on Santos' position in light of the peace talks and his recent reelection.

Working Together: Economic Ties between the United States and Mexico

The report looks at the ways in which regional economic cooperation can enhance competitiveness, stimulate growth and create jobs. There is no doubt that the economies of the United States and Mexico are facing serious challenges. While some of the risk is due to external pressures, whether increasing competition from Asia or fears of crisis in Europe, much of the solution lies in strengthening regional competitiveness. The path forward, then, must be based in a clear understanding that the United States and Mexico are ultimately partners rather than competitors.

In the Wake of War: Democratization and Internal Armed Conflict in Latin America

Examining the cases of Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru, the contributors to this timely edited volume explore how societies undergoing democratization in the aftermath of civil war can become mired in violent crime, poor governance, and illiberal political cultures.

Noticias - Spring 2006

Setting the Agenda for Latin America in the Coming Decade, Mexican Migrant Civic and Political Participation, Domestic and Foreign Policies of Hugo Chavez, the Mensalao Scandal in Brazil, and more!

Pages

Experts & Staff