Events

Webcast

Underage: Addressing Reproductive Health and HIV in Married Adolescents

July 30, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Across the developing world, some 70 million girls under the age of 18 are married. Join USAID’s Office of HIV/AIDS, the International Center for Research on Women, CARE, and Pathfinder International as they present findings on their work with married adolescent girls living in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, West Africa, and other low-resource regions.
Webcast

Nutrition and the Continuum of Care: Pre-Conception to the Post-Natal Period

July 28, 2014 // 2:00pm5:00pm
Good nutrition is very important for the health of women and their babies. Iron, zinc, and iodine deficiencies can lead to malnutrition, which increases susceptibility to disease and reduces immunity, productivity, and development.
Webcast

World Population Day 2014: Youth Engagement and the Sustainable Development Agenda

July 10, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
This year’s World Population Day focuses on youth engagement and the future of the global development agenda as the Millennium Development Goals expire next year. Young people are the key to building a sustainable future because the choices they make now will reverberate for decades to come.
Webcast

Delivering Quality Antenatal Care in Low Resource Settings: Examining Innovative Models and Planning For Scale Up

June 30, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
A roadside billboard in Malawi reads: “No woman should die while giving life.” But in many countries, death or grave injury during childbirth is a frequent occurrence.
Webcast

Pakistan’s Polio Crisis: The Deeper Story

June 10, 2014 // 11:00am12:15pm
The world is witnessing a resurgence of the polio virus, and Pakistani is at its epicenter. This year, Pakistan has already reported about 60 cases—far more than any other country. Most observers blame Pakistan’s worsening polio problem on rising militancy. Yet according to Samia Altaf, there is a deeper story beyond this popular narrative.
Webcast

Can Social Accountability Help Ensure Rights and Better Participation in Maternal Health Services?

May 05, 2014 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Over the last two decades, social accountability has emerged as a strategy to make health services more responsive to community needs. It’s an approach that creates a space for “interaction between citizen engagement and government responsiveness,” said Jonathan Fox, professor of international development at American University at the Wilson Center May 5.
Webcast

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Programs as a Strategy to Advance Maternal Health

March 10, 2014 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Of all the Millennium Development Goals, the maternal health and sanitation targets are among the farthest off track, said Rebecca Fishman, operations and special projects director of WASH Advocates.
Webcast

Improving Maternal Health Through Universal Health Coverage

February 20, 2014 // 12:00pm2:00pm
The global maternal health agenda has been largely defined by the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for the last decade and half, but what will happen after they expire in 2015? What kind of framework is needed to continue the momentum towards eliminating preventable maternal deaths and morbidities?
Webcast

Public-Private Partnerships in Aid: A Tool For U.S. Policy

February 14, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm
By partnering with U.S. corporations, USAID and other development agencies can help developing countries innovate new technologies, leapfrog infrastructure investment, and create new markets and sustainable livelihoods. Using technology and innovation to change the lives of millions around the world, these partnerships may also help shape a different view of America as a global power: smart and capable, focused on success and results, not ideology. However, these partnerships can be a challenge to develop and sustain. How can Congress work with the private sector and development agencies to enable these partnerships for success?
Webcast

Maternal Health and HIV: Global Priorities for Research and Action

January 13, 2014 // 12:00pm4:00pm
Despite the fact that with proper interventions, the likelihood of mother-to-child transmission of HIV is less than five percent, expectant mothers with HIV or AIDS often face intense stigma and marginalization from health care providers around the world. As a result, in some areas, the mortality rate for mothers with HIV is five times greater than the rate for non-infected women

Pages

Experts & Staff

  • Roger-Mark De Souza // Director of Population, Environmental Security, and Resilience, Wilson Center
  • Sandeep Bathala // Senior Program Associate, Environmental Change and Security Program, Maternal Health Initiative
  • Katrina Braxton // Program Assistant, Maternal Health Initiative
  • Schuyler Null // Writer/Editor, Environmental Change and Security Program, Maternal Health Initiative