Events

Whole Nations Waiting: Trade sets records, but congestion threatens competitiveness.-Mexico Institute in the News

Chris Wilson, Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson Center, and Erik Lee write about the U.S.-Mexico trade partnership.

Mexico Institute in the News: Mexico's Drug Murders Down 15-20 Percent, President Says

Homicides in Mexico have dropped 15 percent to 20 percent in the first six months of this year compared to the same period of 2011, according to Mexican President Felipe Calderón. Mexico Institute's Eric Olson comments.

MATT Releases Key Findings and Raw Data from First-Ever Study on the Factors Driving the Return of Mexican Immigrants to Mexico

Mexicans and Americans Thinking Together (MATT) is a bi-national non-profit organization focused on building cultural and economic links between the U.S. and Mexico.At an event on 01/14/2014, MATT shared the findings from a research study conducted in mid-2103 which tells, for the first time, the other half of the immigration story. The study’s findings – The U.S. Mexico Cycle: The End of an Era – details the factors that are driving Mexicans to return to their home country in historic numbers, signaling a major shift in immigration.

Re-Energizing the Border: Renewable Energy, Green Jobs and Border Infrastructure

The U.S.-Mexico border region is one of enormous energy resources, both traditional and renewable. This report provides an overview of the prospects for renewable energy projects in Mexico’s border states, examining the development of wind, solar and municipal solid waste projects. This research evaluates the potential impact of investment in these projects on border communities in terms of employment, infrastructure, human capital and social participation.

The Second Democratic Transition in Mexico: Efforts, obstacles and challenges to Mexico in the quest for a comprehensive, coordinated, consistent form of accountability

During the last decade, Mexico has implemented a comprehensive set of institutional reforms to combat discretion, inefficiency and corruption. After the successful efforts beginning in the last decades to build a new electoral system that allowed a peaceful transition from a single party regime to a pluralist democracy, the public agenda began focusing on challenging the traditional way to exercise authority gained in the polls. This text is a brief summary of the set of changes and challenges Mexico has faced during this period as well as of the vigorous debate on how to build complete, articulate, and coherent accountability in the country.

U.S.-Mexico Policy Bulletin: June 2005

In this month’s bulletin,T. Alexander Aleinikoff, Dean of the Georgetown University Law Center, offers a perspective on an upcoming paradigm shift in U.S. immigration policy and how this may affect the U.S.-Mexico relationship.

Latin America: Mexican stand-off - Mexico Institute in the News

“After 12 years of gridlock, you now have a way of negotiating between the parties that enables legislative progress,” says Duncan Wood, director of the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington. “It has become the central negotiating mechanism for Mexican politics today.”

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