Events

Five Things to Watch for in the Peace Process

There's a great deal we don't know (yet) about John Kerry's efforts to resume negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians. So how are we to know if this process is on the right track and won't become just another woulda/shoulda/coulda enterprise? In this article from ForeignPolicy.com, Aaron David Miller lists five things to look for on the U.S. side.

Has the Arab Spring Become a Nightmare for Women?

In the wake of the Arab Spring, women are not participating in the drafting of new constitutions and political violence against them is on the rise. In this interview, Special Representative to Civil Society for the League of Arab States Haifa Abu Ghazaleh discusses the challenges women of the MENA region are facing in the post-Arab Spring period and prospects for their future.

Egypt Rising: President Morsi Addresses the UN

Egyptian President Morsi's debut on the world stage was anything but tentative. He began by challenging the world to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and addressed the ongoing civil war in Syria, calling it the "tragedy of the age." To gain perspective on the highly-anticipated speech from Egypt's first democratically elected leader, we spoke with former Washington Post Cairo Bureau Chief, David Ottaway, on the eve of his latest trip to Egypt.

Bahraini Human Rights Activist Nabeel Rajab to Receive 2011 Ion Ratiu Democracy Award

Nabeel Rajab, a leading human rights activist and president of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, will receive the 2011 Ion Ratiu Democracy Award, presented annually by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Middle Eastern Women on the Move

As part of its series on gender issues in the Middle East, the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Middle East Project held, on October 2 and 3, 2001, a two-day conference on “Middle Eastern Women on the Move: Openings for and the Constraints on Women’s Political Participation in the Middle East.”

The Limits of Action In Syria

Aaron David Miller considers three core questions that need answering about the military action the president is about to authorize in Syria.

Violence Unsettles Tunisia’s Democratic Transition

Tunisia’s transition to democracy, widely regarded as the most successful to emerge from the five uprisings that shook the Arab world in 2011, is being seriously threatened by violence in the wake of a prominent leftist politician’s assassination in early February. The killing of Chokri Belaid has not only triggered a showdown within the ruling Islamic Ennahda Party between its moderate and fundamentalist wings but also deepened the hostility between secularists and Islamists within Tunisian society.

Combating Human Trafficking: Key Approaches

According to the U.S. State Department, human trafficking is among the fastest growing criminal activities with more than 700,000 people, mostly women and children, trafficked worldwide annually, including 50,000 persons into the United States. This half-day conference focused on trafficking in persons and regional responses to combating this problem.

Negotiating With Iran Part 2: A Matter of Trust

Iran's nuclear program continues to move forward. Israel and the United States have declared a nuclear Iran unacceptable. Negotiations have stalled while sanctions appear to be taking a toll on the Islamic Republic's economy. How will the standoff be resolved? Is a diplomatic solution possible or is a military confrontation inevitable? To gain insight into the possibility for diplomacy to prevail, we spoke with two veteran Iran experts with decades of direct experience in the diplomatic arena. John Limbert, one of the 52 Americans held hostage for 444 days from November 4, 1979, to January 20, 1981, shares his unique perspective on U.S.-Iran relations.

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