Events

Aaron Miller on President Obama's Address on Syria

Aaron David Miller argues that Obama's speech won't sell war-weary Americans on Syria

The Bread Revolutions of 2011 and the Political Economies of Transition

During the 2011 uprisings, Arab protesters channeled decades of discontent with failed economic policy. However, the demise of leaders will not be enough to answer this discontent nor ensure productive development. Scholarship on the political determinants of economic development finds that the common recipe of expanding the private sector and increasing trade openness may be valuable but is not sufficient on its own for successful development. The Arab world’s economic path to 2011 included implementation in these areas, yet reform in underlying socio-economic structures and interests lagged. Addressing these conditions constitutes one of the most serious challenges facing Arab economies and politics.

A New Egypt Must Learn Political Compromise

"Too often, the "winner-takes-all" Mubarak model persists in Egyptian politics. Instead of engaging or working within the system, and compromising, opposition forces protest in Tahrir Square or boycott. While these tactics won a revolution, they will not build a democracy," writes Jane Harman.

Israel and Strategic Challenges in the Middle East

The Middle East continues to be a region in turmoil. From civil war in Syria to ongoing attempts to resolve disagreements over Iran’s nuclear program, there is no shortage of strategic challenges. Yuval Steinitz, Israel’s Minister of Intelligence, Strategic Affairs, and International Relations, discusses these and other issues with the Wilson Center’s Director, President, and CEO, Jane Harman, during this episode of REWIND.

Syria’s Peace Initiative

In this interview on CTV News, Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright discusses the nuanced message in Annan’s latest speech and the great stake that Syria’s allies Russia and Iran have in the outcome of the conflict. Would Assad’s ouster bring peace to Syria or would violence erupt among Syria’s various ethnic groups in a bid for power?

American Policy in Lebanon: Stability Through Dissociation

Lebanon is finally getting Washington’s attention after spending the last four years languishing on the back burner. The Lebanese are now hopeful that maybe the days when Lebanon was a priority in Washington are upon them once again.
A Free Syrian Army fighter takes cover during clashes with Syrian Army in the Salaheddine neighbourhood of central Aleppo August 7, 2012.

Syria: No Good Options

"Governing is about choosing. When America acts, it has to ask itself two questions, not just, can it accomplish it? If we wanted to unseat the Assads, we could do it. The question is not just that, it's what will it cost? It's the second question that always needs to accompany the first," said Aaron David Miller.

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