Events

America Has Nowhere to Go on Egypt

There’s no doubt that American policy toward Egypt and the political turbulence in the Middle East has lacked direction, writes Aaron David Miller in The New York Times. Yet the Obama administration’s approach — working with, not against the military, and essentially giving up on any serious effort on democratic reform — is both logical and necessary.
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Egyptian Protests: Will the Military Step In?

Widespread and intense protests in Egypt raise serious questions about the stability and future of President Mohamed Morsi’s government. David Ottaway talks about the current crisis and its implications for future democratic reforms.

Iraqi-U.S. Relations Amidst Militants

Jane Harman discusses possible U.S. response to militants advances in Iraq on Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace.

Sanctions and Medical Supply Shortages in Iran

The pronounced role of sanctions in creating shortages of life-saving medical supplies and drugs in Iran may have been unintentional, but it is also irrefutable. Iran’s own mismanagement of the situation has aggravated the problem, but it is not the root cause of it. While the list of issues leading to the supply crunch is long and complicated, at the heart of it all are the obstacles that sanctions have created in denying Iran the necessary banking operations and limiting its access to hard currency. Namazi presents findings based on a recent study that he and a number of Iranian consultants carried out.
A demonstrator punches through a portrait of Syria's President Bashar al-Assad during a protest outside the Syrian Embassy in London

The Winners and Losers of Syria's Civil War

Looking ahead to a post-Assad Syria, Aaron David Miller provides a preliminary scorecard of who the winners and losers will be, both within the splintered nation and among foreign stakeholders Russia, Iran, Israel, Lebanon, and the United States.

Reflections on Women in the Arab Spring: Women’s Voices from Around the World

In Celebration of International Women’s Day 2012

A Dream Constitution

One year ago, Egypt was marred by a democratically-elected, autocratic, theocratic president and a deeply flawed constitution. Looking back at the past six months, the fact that Egypt was given a second lease on life and a chance to rewrite the constitution seems like a fairy tale. Is our new constitution a dream constitution? More importantly, could it be a dream that will not come true?

China and the Persian Gulf

Beijing, in its quest looking for energy resources, is slowly and steadily building ties with the resource-rich Persian Gulf states. What implications does this have for Washington which constantly looks to counterbalance China's influence in the global arena? This new book, edited by the Asia Program at the Wilson Center, examines China’s role in the Persian Gulf, evolving views on China from within the Gulf, and what China’s presence means for the United States.

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Experts & Staff