Events

Are Moscow Talks Iran's Last Chance?

Iran meets with the US and five other nations in Moscow this week over its nuclear program. It is their third session in three months in the latest round of an almost decade-old attempt to answer fears that Iran seeks the bomb. Yet the two sides still have irreconcilable positions, and it is hard to see an ice-breaker towards a deal, writes Iran nuclear expert Michael Adler.

Rouhani's Surprising Election

Hassan Rouhani’s surprising first round victory in the presidential elections represents a significant shift in the Iranian political landscape. In a field of candidates dominated by conservatives, Rouhani ran as a moderate. He questioned the necessity of the expanding security state and the constant oversight of student and civil society associations by the security agencies. He spoke of the need for greater freedom of press and speech, and devoted attention to women’s rights issues. Whether he will succeed, or whether he will initiate a change of direction only to be blocked by yet another rightwing backlash, remains to be seen.

Mali: The Time for Dithering is Over

Since Tuareg nationalists and al-Qaeda seized control of northern Mali in February 2012, the world has been dithering about what to do. Neither the United States nor Algeria, two potentially key actors in the unfolding drama, has decided on its role yet. Mali’s neighbors, the African Union, and the UN Security Council have not wanted to take any risky action and have found ways to put off a military response in the slim hope of finding a political solution.
Camp David

How Not to Host a Summit

The 2000 peace talks at Camp David offer three key lessons on how not to solve the world's most intractable conflict, writes Distinguished Scholar Aaron David Miller in Foreign Policy magazine.

Egypt: The Closing of the Political Space

The election of Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to the presidency brings Egypt one step closer to the full implementation of the transitional road map. The last step, the holding of parliamentary elections, is also on schedule. Yet Egypt is not getting closer to democracy. The lopsided result of the presidential elections, with 96.91 of the votes going to al-Sisi, is not a sign of healthy pluralism. The draft of the new parliamentary election law will further hamper pluralism and it will promote fragmentation by reserving about 70 percent of parliamentary seats for independent candidates.

Egyptian Democracy: Is the Ouster of Morsi a Step Forward or Backward?

Many observers see the military’s removal of President Morsi from office as a step backward for democracy and the rule of law. We spoke with a former Egyptian official who believes the opposite and sees the current situation as an example of democracy in action. Moushira Khattab provides context on the evolution of Egyptian politics.

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Experts & Staff