Events

New Offer to Iran Doesn't Look Like a Breakthrough; West Should Bend a Bit

The United States and its five negotiating partners can't decide how far to go in trying to entice Iran and time presses as Iran continues to amass significant nuclear stockpiles and capabilities, writes Iran Nuclear Expert Michael Adler.

US Influence Waning in Middle East?

Distinguished Scholar Aaron David Miller appears on Fox News to talk about U.S. friends and enemies in the Middle East.

American Policy in the Maghreb: Counterterrorism is Not Enough

U.S. policy toward the Maghreb countries is presently driven above all by security concerns. Although three of the four countries—Morocco, Tunisia, and Libya—have experienced considerable political change since 2011 and Algeria is on the verge of a succession crisis with potentially significant consequences, the United States is not deeply involved in these transitions. Exhausted and disappointed by failed nation-building efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan, the United States seems to be moving toward the opposite extreme, neglecting political transformations to focus on security. Unless the countries restore or maintain political stability, however, counterterrorism efforts cannot succeed

Michael Adler on the latest IAEA Report on Iran

Public Policy Scholar Michael Adler reacts to latest report by the International Atomic Energy Agency

Has the Arab Spring Produced a Chasm between the Revolutionary and Status Quo Countries in the Arab World?

While some experts predicted that the Arab rebellions of spring 2011 (and beyond) would widen the strategic, political, and even ideological gap between Arab states undergoing dramatic change and those defending the status quo, in fact, no such clear breach has occurred. Instead, Dawisha argues that economic crisis, escalating Shi’i-Sunni tensions, and the associated realpolitik concerns of the Western powers have dampened the potentially incendiary demonstration effect of Arab political revolts on the course of both domestic political change and regional politics.

Repression’s Diminishing Returns: The Future of Politics in Egypt

Many analysts have rushed to declare a political outcome for Egypt's transition. Stacher argues that we must understand Egypt’s transition as a process of change rather than a finalized outcome. In doing so, he details the structural limits of governing Egypt as well as the receding capacity of state elites to deploy repression as a means of political control.

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