Events

Does Iran’s New President Open a Path to Nuclear Compromise?

Will Iran’s new president defuse the confrontation with the United States over the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program? Rowhani has the credentials to bring a new spirit to the talks writes Michael Adler in Breaking Defense.

Is It Possible to Negotiate With Iran?

For the last 30 years, the United States and Iran largely have remained estranged from each other, but the Obama administration has expressed interest in a dialogue with Iran. Two recent Middle East Program events explored whether negotiation is possible in the current atmosphere.

Iran, the Next Five Years: Change or More of the Same? (Spring 2014)

On March 26, 2014, the Middle East Program convened the second of three meetings on Iran under President Hassan Rouhani, this time exploring possible trends and developments in the next five years under the Rouhani presidency. This publication brings together the papers presented at our second meeting in the current series.

Global Authoritarians and the Arab Spring: New Challenges for U.S. Diplomacy

As the Arab Spring enters its third year, the contours of a new strategic landscape are taking shape in the Middle East. Reflecting the disordered state of regional politics, this landscape is far from stable. Yet it contains features that will pose significant challenges for U.S. diplomacy.
Robin Wright on Morning Joe

Muslim Brotherhood and the Future of the Middle East

USIP-Wilson Center Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright joined MSNBC's "Morning Joe" to discuss her book "The Islamists are Coming," the rise of the Islamic political movement, and its staying power.

What Can the West do in Syria?

Robin Wright discusses options for the US and the West in stemming the violence in Syria on Sky News.

Morocco's Arab Spring

By David B. Ottaway, Senior Scholar, Woodrow Wilson Center and former Bureau Chief, Washington Post, Cairo

The Syrian Refugee Crisis is Pushing Lebanon to the Brink

The Syrian refugee issue in Lebanon is threatening to become the real humanitarian crisis in the region. There are more Syrian refugees in Lebanon than in any other country in the region. Straddled by a weak economy, domestic political infighting, and internal divisions over the crisis in Syria, Lebanon is finding it hard to cope with the evolving problem inside its borders. In the absence of a quick and sustained international support, the refugee issue in Lebanon could become a full blown crisis with domestic and regional implications for Lebanon.

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Experts & Staff