Events

Getting the Story in Iraq---At What Cost?

In the chaotic, precarious landscape that is Iraq, can journalists do their job? 2004 Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and current Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Anthony Shadid contends that Iraq's future and journalists' ability to cover the nation are linked and will depend on the situation on the ground. In this article, Shadid relates what he has learned over the past year covering Iraq, both on the ground and here in Washington, DC. He also reveals what he considers the most far-reaching, if least noticed aspect of the war in Iraq.

Has the Arab Spring Become a Nightmare for Women?

In the wake of the Arab Spring, women are not participating in the drafting of new constitutions and political violence against them is on the rise. In this interview, Special Representative to Civil Society for the League of Arab States Haifa Abu Ghazaleh discusses the challenges women of the MENA region are facing in the post-Arab Spring period and prospects for their future.

Egypt Rising: President Morsi Addresses the UN

Egyptian President Morsi's debut on the world stage was anything but tentative. He began by challenging the world to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and addressed the ongoing civil war in Syria, calling it the "tragedy of the age." To gain perspective on the highly-anticipated speech from Egypt's first democratically elected leader, we spoke with former Washington Post Cairo Bureau Chief, David Ottaway, on the eve of his latest trip to Egypt.

China and the Persian Gulf

This new book examines China’s role in the Persian Gulf, evolving views on China from within the Gulf, and what China’s presence means for the United States.

Iran’s Foreign Minister Says Sanctions Would Kill Nuclear Deal

In a wide-ranging interview with TIME in Tehran on Dec. 7, Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright interviewed Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif about how the Geneva nuclear deal came together, how the government has to appear to Iran’s own parliament not to undermine the interim pact, and how any new sanctions passed by the United States Congress would kill the deal.

You Thought the Brotherhood Was Bad?

In one of the many bizarre twists of Egypt's recent political convulsion, hardline Salafi parties look poised to replace the Muslim Brotherhood as the most important Islamist players in the political process. It's a situation ripe with irony, writes Senior Scholar Marina Ottaway.

Iran Under President Ahmadinejad

The June 26 meeting presented a reversal of the overarching conclusion of last year's conference that the election of President Ahmadinejad would not significantly affect Iran's path of reform. This underestimation was addressed with a discussion of the recent developments and trends in Iran. The first panel featured a discussion of the national political and socio-economic situation as well as a presentation on the power of the local democratic establishment in Iran. Speakers addressed the real versus perceived command capacity of President Ahmadinejad, the fruition or failure of his socio-economic policies, and the seeming reversal of local democratic reform under his administration. The second panel focused on Iran's foreign policy drivers, options, and goals. Speakers touched on Iran's historical and strategic ambitions in the Caspian region as well as its relations with Europe and the United States. They discussed Iran's attempt to secure itself economically and the strategic determinants steering the country's actions and overtures.

10 Dangers in the Iraq Crisis

“The danger from the extremist movement growing in Iraq is not just creating failed states out of Iraq and Syria but spawning a failed region,” writes Robin Wright.

Violence Unsettles Tunisia’s Democratic Transition

Tunisia’s transition to democracy, widely regarded as the most successful to emerge from the five uprisings that shook the Arab world in 2011, is being seriously threatened by violence in the wake of a prominent leftist politician’s assassination in early February. The killing of Chokri Belaid has not only triggered a showdown within the ruling Islamic Ennahda Party between its moderate and fundamentalist wings but also deepened the hostility between secularists and Islamists within Tunisian society.

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