Events

The Women's Movement in Iran

In this chapter from The Iran Primer, Haleh Esfandiari provides an historical overview of the women's movement in Iran.

Ripples of the Arab Spring: Revolt and the Role of Women

Pro-democracy rebellions have erupted across the Middle East since December 2010. The Wilson Center's Middle East Program continues to hold meetings to explore effects in different countries and among different groups, including women. Events included a June event in which three female panelists participated in the Wilson Center session from Egypt, via Skype.

Will Annan Save Assad?

Kofi Annan’s plan for a political transition in Syria won’t end the violence and could make things much worse for the opposition by weakening international resolve, says Distinguished Scholar Aaron David Miller in a New York Times opinion piece.

More Than Victims: The Role of Women in Conflict Prevention (PDF)

Click to see the table of contents, or download the full PDF below.
Khameni and Missile

Body Language, Small Steps Key to Iran Nuclear Talks

No one expects a concrete agreement to come out of the P5+1 meeting to revive a diplomatic process that stalled almost a year-and-a-half ago. The success of this meeting hinges on whether the Islamic Republic is serious about making a deal on its nuclear program. But can such a weighty matter hinge on how an Iranian diplomat acts and speaks at a meeting, rather than on whether an agreement is reached? Michael Adler reports from Istanbul.

Post-Post War Reconstruction in Iraq

In this Director's Forum, Nesreen Berwari, Minister for Municipalities and Public Works in Iraq outlined what has been accomplished and what lies ahead in the rebuilding of the nation. In her remarks, Berwari emphasized the critically important role of women in Iraq's transition to democracy and stability.

A New Challenge for Palestinians

Prime Minister Salam Fayyad's resignation has the potential to inject clarity and honesty into the region's problems, writes Aaron David Miller in this op-ed from The Los Angeles Times.

Learning Politics in Tunisia

Two years after the uprising that forced President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali into exile, Tunisians are slowly coming to grips with the reality of politics in a pluralist system where opposition is real and the outcome of political contestation is not predetermined. The process is slow and somewhat uncertain, and it would be premature to conclude that Tunisian politicians have fully embraced not only the concept of democracy but also its concrete implications.

Pages

The Iran Primer Blog

Upcoming Events

Experts & Staff