Events

Khameni and Missile

Body Language, Small Steps Key to Iran Nuclear Talks

No one expects a concrete agreement to come out of the P5+1 meeting to revive a diplomatic process that stalled almost a year-and-a-half ago. The success of this meeting hinges on whether the Islamic Republic is serious about making a deal on its nuclear program. But can such a weighty matter hinge on how an Iranian diplomat acts and speaks at a meeting, rather than on whether an agreement is reached? Michael Adler reports from Istanbul.

Reflections on Iran’s Tumultuous Revolution: 35 Years Later

Iran marked the 35th anniversary of its Islamic Revolution on February 11. Shaul Bakhash, who witnessed the revolution first-hand, reflects on the revolution’s tumultuous birth and its legacy and how it differed from the still-born revolution in Egypt during the Arab Spring.

A New Challenge for Palestinians

Prime Minister Salam Fayyad's resignation has the potential to inject clarity and honesty into the region's problems, writes Aaron David Miller in this op-ed from The Los Angeles Times.

New Dangers in Familiar Gaza Violence

Confrontation between Israel and Hamas is an old movie. But the grim version playing out now -- with Hamas rockets, particularly use of a long range Fajr 5, aimed at Tel Aviv , Israeli airstrikes and the killing of a top Hamas official -- contains new and disturbing scenes. That said, there is reason to hope this won't turn into a complete disaster film. And Egypt may well be the key.

"Algeria’s Islamists Crushed in First Arab Spring Elections" by David B. Ottaway

David B. Ottaway is a senior scholar at the Wilson Center who has recently returned from Algeria. The following piece is an overview of his observations of Algeria’s May 10 parliamentary elections.

UN Nuclear Watchdog Warns on Iran and Syria

By Michael Adler, Public Policy Scholar, Woodrow Wilson Center

Back to the Drawing Boards

The Obama administration has sometimes been tactically adroit in dealing with Egypt since the fall of Mubarak in February 2011; at other times it has been caught flat-footed. But the nature of political changes afoot in Egypt today now demands more than adjustment, but instead a fundamental rethinking of a relationship that has been a cornerstone of U.S. policy in the Middle East since the Nixon administration.

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