Events

Middle East Program 2012 Year in Review

In 2012, the Middle East Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center produced 19 publications and 39 meetings.
Jane Harman Morning Joe

Assessing the Situation in Afghanistan, Syria, and Egypt

Wilson Center Director, President, and CEO Jane Harman appeared on MSNBC’s "Morning Joe" to discuss US foreign policy with Dr. Zbigniew Brzezinski and the Morning Joe hosts. The conversation included discussion of UN Peace Envoy Kofi Annan’s call for a peaceful solution in Syria, whether the mission has been accomplished in Afghanistan, and the current state of Egypt.

Tunisia’s Islamist-Led Democracy Founders

The failure of Tunisia's ruling Islamic Ennahda movement to convince secular parties and civil society groups that it is truly committed to the separation of religion and state underlies the current political crisis there. Ennahda's moderate leadership has made repeated compromises on religious issues to meet secularist demands for a new constitution. But it has lost their trust by showing too much deference to its own militant Islamic wing and fundamentalist Salafis outside the movement.

Woodrow Wilson Center's Visiting Arab Journalist Program: 2012

The Middle East Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is pleased to announce the 2012 competition for the Wilson Center's Visiting Arab Journalist Program. One Arab, Middle Eastern or North African journalist will be selected each year. Successful applicants will spend 3 months in residence at the Woodrow Wilson Center, in the heart of Washington, D.C., where they will carry out advanced, policy-oriented research and writing. This program is made possible by generous financial support provided by Dr. David Ottaway, a Senior Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center.

Change May Be Greater Than Anyone Expected

By choosing the candidate least identified with the recent policies of the ruling system, a majority sent a strong message to the Supreme Leader and the regime, writes Haleh Esfandiari, in the New York Time's "Room for Debate" section.
Trita Parsi

Iran-U.S. Ties Fray on Nuclear Concerns

The threat of military confrontation between Iran and the U.S. is real, as bilateral relations touch a low point on Iran’s pursuit of a nuclear weapon, says Trita Parsi, founder of the National Iranian American Council. A former Wilson Center public policy scholar, Parsi questions whether efforts to negotiate and engage with Iran have hastened conflict, making war a more real risk than under the Bush administration, which employed a more hardline approach to Iran.

Don't expect an Obama-Netanyahu blowup

Aaron David Miller writes for CNN.com that Obama and Netanyahu may have less reason to fight each other following elections in both the U.S. and Israel.

Iran Nuclear Tensions Less a Worry in Europe

Europeans feel less of a threat than do Americans, though proliferation remains a concern, EU lawmaker Tarja Cronberg tells Context. “I do not think there is the same sense of urgency ... or [the belief] that Iran could attack Europe.”

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