Events

Will Progress On Nuke Talks Mean More Engagement From Iran?

Middle East Program Director Haleh Esfandiari contributes to NPR's "All Things Considered" on the topic of "Will Progress On Nuke Talks Mean More Engagement From Iran?"
Child Targets in Syria

Child Targets in Syria

Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright talks with BBC World News America about new allegations by the UN High Commission on Human Rights that the Syrian military have been targeting children.

The Hague Tribunal and the Hariri Assassination

On January 16 in The Hague, the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) will open the trial of the suspects in the assassination of former Prime Minister of Lebanon Rafiq Hariri and 21 others who died with him. This trial can be important for Lebanon, for the region, and for the United Nations' tribunals because it carries the hope of ending a culture of impunity in Lebanon and in introducing a new culture that chooses the courts and the rule of law over revenge, retribution, and violence in the Middle East. The outcome of the trial has stark implications for the future of Lebanon and for international justice.

More Than Victims: The Role of Women in Conflict Prevention

On September 12, 2002, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and Women Waging Peace co-sponsored a conference entitled "More than Victims: The Role of Women in Conflict Prevention." The aim of the meeting was to move beyond the stereotypical images of women as victims in conflict and to explore their complex experiences as fighters, peacebuilders, survivors and protectors. This report provides a summary of the panel presentations and rich discussions that followed. While highlighting many of the challenges that remain, it provides concrete examples of how the international community in general can support women’s efforts and peacebuilding processes.

Region’s Hardliners Will Take Heart

The military government that is fast taking shape in Egypt will strengthen the hands of the hardliners across the region, writes Haleh Esfandiari in The New York Times.

As Islamists stumble in Egypt and Tunisia, the Arab Spring turns wintery

Of all the states that rose against tyranny, Egypt and Tunisia have traveled the furthest on the road to democratic transformation. However, concerns about the Islamists’ fidelity to democracy continue to mount. This is particularly so in Egypt where the president seems susceptible to authoritarian proclivities and the Islamist elite show little inclination to compromise. In Tunisia, the prospects for democracy are relatively better as Ennahda, partners in the governing coalition, have little choice but to be flexible. It is rather ironic that democratic transformation is left in the hands of those professing fidelity to principles whose compatibility with democracy is contested.

Winning the Peace: Forum Explores Role of Women in Post-Conflict Iraq

In this recent two-day conference, Iraqi women leaders and international policymakers came together to discuss the future prospects for women in Iraq and the role that women can play in the transition to self-government in the country.

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