Events

The Islamists are Coming CONTEXT

The Islamists Are Coming: Who They Really Are

Greater political pluralism in Tunisia, Egypt, and other countries of the region could augur less dependency on the US and a more independent foreign policy, Wilson Center expert Samer Shehata says. In this interview, Shehata and Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright analyze the Middle East’s evolving political landscape.
Egypt's first Islamist president Mohamed Mursi attends during his meeting with Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu at the presidential palace in Cairo July 2, 2012. Egypt will approach the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and other financial institutions to help get its economy back on track once Mursi appoints a government, one of his financial advisers told Reuters.

Egypt's Fundamental Crisis of Legitimacy

Wilson Center Senior Scholar Marina Ottaway discussed the legitimacy of the outcome of Egypt's recent elections and the validity of the country's new constitution in a June 6, 2013 National Interest article.

Iran, the Next Five Years: Change or More of the Same? (Spring 2014)

On March 26, 2014, the Middle East Program convened the second of three meetings on Iran under President Hassan Rouhani, this time exploring possible trends and developments in the next five years under the Rouhani presidency. This publication brings together the papers presented at our second meeting in the current series.

More Than Victims: The Role of Women in Conflict Prevention

On September 12, 2002, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and Women Waging Peace co-sponsored a conference entitled "More than Victims: The Role of Women in Conflict Prevention." The aim of the meeting was to move beyond the stereotypical images of women as victims in conflict and to explore their complex experiences as fighters, peacebuilders, survivors and protectors. This report provides a summary of the panel presentations and rich discussions that followed. While highlighting many of the challenges that remain, it provides concrete examples of how the international community in general can support women’s efforts and peacebuilding processes.

Moscow Talks Grind To Halt; Some Progress Claimed

"The goal of winning "concrete steps" from Iran is still far away. This gives fuel to those who argue that time is running out because Iran continues to expand its enrichment and other nuclear work. And it puts a question mark over what the results in Moscow mean going forward," writes Iran nuclear expert Michael Adler.

Winning the Peace: Forum Explores Role of Women in Post-Conflict Iraq

In this recent two-day conference, Iraqi women leaders and international policymakers came together to discuss the future prospects for women in Iraq and the role that women can play in the transition to self-government in the country.

Who Lost Iraq?

"We didn't sign up for nation-building, kept denying that's what we wanted to do, and in the end stopped trying," writes Aaron David Miller.

John Kerry, Lone Ranger of the Middle East

John Kerry has made the Middle East peace process a major priority of his term as secretary of state. But the prospects of success are not very high. That raises the question of what Kerry's strategy is -- and what his motivations are, writes Aaron David Miller in Foreign Affairs.

Sanctions and Medical Supply Shortages in Iran

The pronounced role of sanctions in creating shortages of life-saving medical supplies and drugs in Iran may have been unintentional, but it is also irrefutable. Iran’s own mismanagement of the situation has aggravated the problem, but it is not the root cause of it. While the list of issues leading to the supply crunch is long and complicated, at the heart of it all are the obstacles that sanctions have created in denying Iran the necessary banking operations and limiting its access to hard currency. Namazi presents findings based on a recent study that he and a number of Iranian consultants carried out.

Can International Human Rights Norms Secure Women’s Rights in the MENA Region? (Fall 2013)

This publication is the outcome of the July 10, 2013 conference of the same name co-sponsored by the Middle East Program, Global Women’s Leadership Initiative, Environmental Change and Security Program, and Global Health Initiative. Women leaders and activists from the Middle East write about the current women’s rights situation on the ground in the region and what strategies can be employed to use international human rights norms to secure their rights going forward.

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