Events

Event Transcript - Researching the Middle East

Transcript for a panel discussion on the challenges of researching and writing on recent Middle East history.

David Ottaway on President Obama's Address on Syria

David Ottaway comments on President Obama's speech to Congress making his case for military action against Syria.

Likud Referendum Examined through Peace Index Survey

The Peace Index project is conducted at the Tami Steinmetz Center for Peace Research of Tel Aviv University, headed by Prof. Ephraim Yaar and Dr. Tamar Hermann. The telephone interviews for the Peace Index were conducted by the B. I. Cohen Institute of Tel Aviv University from May 4-6, 2004 and included 581 interviewees who represent the adult Jewish and Arab population of Israel (including the territories and the kibbutzim).

A New Egypt Must Learn Political Compromise

"Too often, the "winner-takes-all" Mubarak model persists in Egyptian politics. Instead of engaging or working within the system, and compromising, opposition forces protest in Tahrir Square or boycott. While these tactics won a revolution, they will not build a democracy," writes Jane Harman.

The Arab Awakening: A Step Forward or Back For Women?

The initial optimism in the wake of the "Arab Spring" has in some cases given way to fears of women being marginalized through the rise of fundamentalist religious political parties. An expert on the global struggle for human rights, Rangita de Silva de Alwis, offers her analysis.

Exorcizing the Islamic Ghost Haunting North Africa

The victory of moderate Islamist parties in parliamentary elections, first in Tunisia and now in Morocco, confirms the most significant change wrought so far by the Arab revolts of this past year-- their emergence into the mainstream of Arab politics as leading players. Whether these elections will exorcize the “Islamic ghost” haunting North Africa, Europe, and the United States remains to be seen, but initial signs are mostly promising.

Why Obama Won’t Give (or Get) Much in Saudi Arabia

"Key linkages—billions in recent U.S. weapons sales, counter-terrorism cooperation, and all that oil—will keep Riyadh and Washington together for some time to come, whether each side, deep down, really likes it or not," writes Aaron David Miller.

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