Events

Iraq Ten Years Later: A Different Country in a Different Region (Spring 2013)

Senior Scholar Marina Ottaway writes that ten years after the U.S. invasion to overthrow Saddam Hussein, Iraq remains a deeply troubled country, rent by internal dissensions and caught in the maelstrom of the increasingly sectarian politics of the region.

Israeli Security: Has it Changed in the Wake of the Arab Spring?

Efraim Halevy, former Director of Mossad and one of Israel’s most preeminent strategic thinkers, provides his perspective on how sweeping changes throughout the region may be altering the security scenario for Israel and its allies.

Algeria’s Islamists Crushed in First Arab Spring Elections

David Ottaway is a senior scholar at the Wilson Center who has recently returned from Algeria. The following piece is an overview of his observations of Algeria’s May 10 parliamentary elections.
Adler and Miller

Iran's Nuclear Program: Reaction to the IAEA Report

Is Iran destined to become a nuclear power? Aaron David Miller and Michael Adler weigh the options, including whether military action might succeed where sanctions and diplomacy so far failed.

The Powerless Peacemaker

Right now, the odds of an enduring success -- a comprehensive agreement signed by Israelis and Palestinians that can actually be implemented -- are pretty long ones, writes Aaron David Miller.

A Premature Spring

By Roberto Toscano, Public Policy Scholar, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars *a shorter version of this piece appeared in the July 2011 issue of the Wilson Center's Centerpoint*

Will U.S.-Russia Deal Change Battlefield Realities in Syria?

In this op-ed, Robin Wright provides a scorecard on how the U.S.-Russia deal to rid Syria of its chemical weapons may play out for some of the key players.

Wilson Forum - Strategic Options for Iran: Balancing Pressure with Diplomacy

Former senior national security officials, military officers, and experts with decades of Middle East experience present a balanced report on the strategic options for dealing with Iran.

After the Arab Spring

"On the second anniversary of the Arab uprisings, millions across the Middle East still have dreams of makeovers. But revolutionary fairy tales have devolved into the reality of running countries that are still without fully functioning governments or basic laws. Providing fundamental public services, much less addressing economic woes that sparked the uprisings, is still a very long way off," writes DIstinguished Scholar Robin Wright.

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