Program

Events

New Thinking in International Trade: Global Competition and Comparative Advantage

The volume features recent work by Nobel Laureate Paul Samuelson and a thought provoking book, Global Trade and Conflicting National Interest by Ralph Gomory, the recently retired director of the Sloan Foundation, and New York University Professor William Baumol. Using different approaches, the three authors point to the ability of public and private sectors to change a country's comparative advantage in ways that can reduce the gains from trade for the United States or other advanced industrial countries. The volume also features a number of commentators who amplify, complement, or question the importance of the findings of the three authors. The conference on new thinking in international trade was made possible through a generous grant of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

NAFTA at 10
Wilson Center Sponsors Conference Celebrating Tenth Anniversary of the Historic Trade Agreement

Ten years ago, President George H.W. Bush, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, and President Carlos Salinas de Gortari initialed the North American Free Trade Agreement. During this two-day conference, these leaders and other distinguished panelists will discuss the impact of NAFTA on trade, globalization, and further integration of North America.

Small Business is Big Business in America

Over the past years, the Wilson Center's Program on America and the Global Economy has held a series of conferences, meetings, and briefings that have focused on different aspects of the small business economy. In this report, Kent Hughes puts small business in the context of the American economy and the American innovation with a specific focus on federal initiatives, the sources of finance for small business, and the role of public-private partnerships in supporting small business.

America's Energy Future

Sander Gerber, a member of the Center's Board of Trustees, suggests ways our nation can meet current and future energy challenges.

New Thinking in International Trade: National Strategies to Build Comparative Advantage

The second volume notes that several countries are, in fact, working to change their comparative advantage by making investments in education, research and development, and infrastructure. They are also adopting policies that create an environment that encourages private sector investment and risk taking. In discussing how the United States should respond to the shifting comparative advantage of our trading partners, Senators Lamar Alexander and Jeff Bingaman stress the importance of increased investments in the physical sciences and the need to improve mathematics and science education. Other conference participants focus on policies in key regions of the world and still others urge attention to the U.S. current account and fiscal deficits. The conference on new thinking in international trade was made possible through a generous grant of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The Trans - Atlantic South Partnership: Positions on Building a Mutually Beneficial Partnership with Africa

It is very simple. Until the U.S. is as optimally invested, or doing business as briskly as the Chinese, the EU, Indians, Brazilians or Vietnamese; the world’s largest economy can neither expand its commercial footprint in Africa nor make a portentous impact on the lives of over a billion Africans.

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