Events

Building the Next American Century

Collaboration between the public and private sectors helped the U.S. economy recover from its last period of economic malaise, and similar collaboration is needed today, according to a key participant in the 1980s–1990s competitiveness movement.In Building the Next American Century, Kent H. Hughes describes that movement, beginning with the conditions that stimulated it: stagflation in the early 1970s, declines in manufactured exports, and challenges from German and Japanese manufacturers. The United States responded with monetary and fiscal reform, technological innovation, and formation of a culture of lifelong learning. Although a great deal of leadership came from government, a new sense of partnership with the private sector and its leaders was crucial. Hughes attributes much of the national prosperity of the late 1990s to contributions from the private sectors. Hughes argues that a twenty-first-century competitiveness strategy with a system-wide approach to innovation, learning, and global engagement can meet today's challenges, even in the demanding environment shaped by national security concerns after 9/11.---Kent H. Hughes has served as President of the Council on Competitiveness, Associate Deputy Secretary of Commerce, Senior Economist of the Congressional Joint Economic Committee, Chief Economist to Senate Majority Leader Robert C. Byrd, and in a number of other important positions. He is currently director of the Project on Science, Technology, America, and the Global Economy at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.Building the Next American Century: The Past and Future of Economic Competitiveness(Woodrow Wilson Press, 2005)Price: $55.00 hardcover;$24.95 paperISBN 0-8018-8204-4 hardcover; 0-8018-8203-6 paperDistributed by: Johns Hopkins University PressTelephone: 1-800-537-5467 To order this book please visit: http://www.press.jhu.edu/books/title_pages/8814.html

Biofuels: Food, Fuel, and the Future?

The Program on America and the Global Economy (PAGE) and its Global Energy Initiative together with the Brazil Institute, have held a series of conferences that have focused in whole or in part on various developments in the field of biofuels. In the July 23, 2010 conference, PAGE turned to two scholars, C. Ford Runge and Robbin S. Johnson, both with ties to the University of Minnesota, to provide the current state of play in the development of biofuels, particularly in the United States. A second panel moderated by the Brazil Institute's Paulo Sotero focused on biofuels in an international context.

JOBS Act a Win for Startups and Economy

The Jumpstart our Business Startups, or JOBS Act, is a win for entrepreneurship as well as bipartisan politics, and given economic hardship, unemployment and political bickering, it's time for a win, writes Public Policy Scholar Amy Wilkinson.

Obama’s Goal to Double Exports: A Midterm Analysis

Today’s report on the U.S. trade performance for May 2012 shows that the Obama Administration is roughly on track to achieve the President’s lofty goal of doubling U.S. exports over the five year period ending in 2014.

Promoting Entrepreneurship in America

The Atlanta Fed recently hosted a Public Affairs Forum on "Advancing Entrepreneurship in America: Building Blocks for Success." The October event featured Wilson Center public policy scholar Amy Wilkinson who is also a senior fellow at Harvard's Kennedy School Center for Business and Government.

Brazil's Innovation Challenge

A joint online publication from the Brazil Institute and STAGE from the first installment of a two-part conference, in which a distinguished eight-member panel discussed how public policies, governmental institutions and the adoption of intellectual property rights affect efficacy and the use of innovation throughout Brazil's economy.

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Upcoming Events

The Source of Financial Crisis

May 01, 2014 // 12:00pm1:00pm

Experts & Staff