Events

Africa’s Long Spring

Long before it came to the Arab world, spring swept through sub-Saharan Africa. In 1990, Mozambique drafted its first multiparty, democratic constitution. The next year saw multiparty elections in what had been one-party states in Benin, Gabon, and Zambia, as well as the overthrow of Mali’s dictator and, subsequently, the election of new leaders. Every succeeding year brought new steps forward for democracy—in Ghana, Kenya, and the Republic of the Congo in 1992, and elsewhere on the continent in subsequent years. The world only paid attention when South Africa joined the ranks of democratic nations in 1994.

Engaging Leaders for Statebuilding: The Case of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

This study describes efforts made since 2006 from a Leadership Project and Africa Program-combined initiative, the Initiative for a Cohesive Leadership in the DRC (ILCCE).

Is World Peace Through Conflict Prevention Possible?

This book review, by Lee. H. Hamilton, of David Hamburg's No More Killing Fields: Preventing Deadly Conflict (December 2003) is available online.

Woodrow Wilson Awards for Public Service and Corporate Citizenship Presented in South Africa

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars recently presented the Woodrow Wilson Award for Public Service to South African Finance Minister Trevor A. Manuel and the Woodrow Wilson Award for Corporate Citizenship to South African entrepreneur Raymond Ackerman at a dinner in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Catalytic Initiatives for Country-Level Peace-Building Strategies: What are They Accomplishing?

The second occasional paper of the series is based on a public forum that took place on June 20, 2006, at the Wilson Center entitled "Catalytic Initiatives for Country Level Peace-building Strategies: What Are They Accomplishing?" Michael Lund, Consulting Program Manager to the Project on Leadership and Building State Capacity and Senior Specialist for Conflict and Peacebuilding at Management Systems International Inc. (MSI), moderated the session. The publication was compiled and edited by Georgina Petrosky and Sarah Cussen of the Leadership Project and Project Intern Jaclyn Burger.

How Should America Respond to Economic Opportunities in Africa?

U.S. policy toward Africa has been on autopilot for much of the past four years, following a laundry list of good intentions that established priorities for Africa’s well-being and U.S. security interests. However, a truly sustainable and forward-looking U.S. policy toward Africa should refocus attention on Africa’s opportunity as an economic powerhouse of the future, a strategy that combines both domestic self-interest and an opportunity to help Africa move forward.

Peacebuilding from Below: The Role of Decentralized South-South Cooperation in Africa

"The problem of violent conflict and the instability it creates remains a major global preoccupation, owing to the recognition that development can hardly take root in such settings and that conflict-affected states could be breeding grounds for all kinds of international insecurity."

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Experts & Staff