Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

PEN 11 - Room at the Bottom?

View State and local governments often have adopted trailblazing initiatives to address environmental, health and safety concerns in advance or in lieu of federal action. With nanotechnology, an emerging field of science with unknown risks, this practice is continuing, a landmark study has found. “In the absence of action at the federal level, local and state governments may begin to explore their options for oversight of nanotechnology,” says author Suellen Keiner. The report discusses possible options for state and local governments to follow that would allow for oversight of the potential negative impacts of nanotechnology – including local air, waste and water regulations, as well as labeling and worker safety requirements.

The Social Life of Information

John Seely Brown, Chief Scientist, XEROX and co-author (with Paul Duguid) of the book The Social Life of Information.Many believe that computerization is adversely affecting the place of books, libraries, universities and conversation. John Seely Brown thinks that this is a misperception. He argues that the flourishing of the computer age will call for increased reliance on the social formation of knowledge. In this interview, John Seely Brown discusses his recent book (co-authored with Paul Duguid), The Social Life of Information, and talks about the evolution of information technology in our complex and often unpredictable social world.

The Role of Crowdsourcing in Disaster Relief and Communicating with Unfree Societies

John Crowley, research fellow at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and public policy scholar with the Wilson Center Science and Technology Innovation Program. A. Ross Johnson, research fellow with the Hoover Institution and also a senior scholar with the Wilson Center's History and Public Policy Program.

PEN 18 - Oversight of Next Generation Nanotechnology

View Existing health and safety agencies are unable to cope with the risk assessment, standard setting and oversight challenges of advancing nanotechnology. The nation needs a new agency to address current forms of pollution and to deal with the health and environmental impacts of the technically complex products promised by rapid 21st century scientific advances. In this landmark report, Oversight of Next Generation Nanotechnology, J. Clarence (Terry) Davies calls for a new Department of Environmental and Consumer Protection to oversee product regulation, pollution control and monitoring, and technology assessment.

Woodrow Wilson Center and IBM Explore the Future of Computing

Managing just one computer can tax the average person's technical capabilities. How do we thrive in a world where we might be connected to thousands of computational devices, which are connected to each other? This seminar and discussion explored the emerging world of autonomic computing. The video of the meeting is available here.

Nanotechnology Doesn't Make News

Nanotechnology is hailed by some scientists, venture capitalists, and government officials as the next industrial revolution. But two media experts at a program sponsored by the Wilson Center's Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies report that, compared to other areas of science, nanotechnology newspaper coverage is scarce.

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Upcoming Events

The National Plan for Civil Earth Observations

September 04, 2014 // 1:00pm2:30pm

Complexity and the Art of Public Policy

September 12, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm

Experts & Staff