Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

New Case Study Examines STIP Nanotechnology Work

A new case study looks at the work of the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, part of the Wilson Center's Science & Technology Innovation Program, amidst the shift from government-led technology assessment towards a greater role played by non-governmental organizations.

Another Game for Congress to Play

"'Budget Hero' is not quite “Angry Birds” — yet it will leave you squawking mad about the ruinous consequences of politicians’ failure to reach a debt agreement," writes Dana Milbank about the latest edition of the game that allows players to play out budget scenarios using the budget policies of President Obama and Governor Romney as well as the impending “fiscal cliff.”

The Wisdom of Gamers

January 2007 - How many players does it take to balance the budget? David Rejeski wants you to put on your game face.

Seven Myths and Realities about Do-It-Yourself Biology

This report challenges seven widely held beliefs about DIYbio practitioners, particularly that anonymous scientists are cooking up deadly epidemics in their basements. In fact, the survey finds most lab work being done in the community is benign and that the vast majority of those surveyed perform their experiments in group workspaces with other enthusiasts. The report also includes six policy recommendations based on the survey results.

The National Broadband Map: A Case Study on Open Innovation for National Policy

A white paper on the policy and technology behind the National Broadband Map, an open-source geographic information systems application allowing users to access detailed statistics on internet connectivity. This project demonstrates the value of transparency, collaboration, and cooperation in government projects.

PEN 10 - Where Does the Nano Go? End-of-Life Regulation of Nanotechnologies

View All materials and products eventually come to the end of their useful life, and those made with nanotechnology are no different. This means that engineered nanomaterials will ultimately enter the waste stream and find their way into landfills or incinerators—and eventually into the air, soil and water. As a result, it is important to consider how various forms of nanomaterials will be disposed of and treated at the end of their use, and how the regulatory system will treat such materials at the various stages of their lifecycle.

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Upcoming Events

Webcast

Data Journalism and Policymaking: A Changing Landscape

July 30, 2014 // 10:00am12:00pm

Experts & Staff