Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

Is 3-D Printing a Game Changer?

David Rejeski, Director of the Wilson Center’s Science and Technology Innovation Program, discusses the potential of 3-D printing and digital fabrication.

New Life, Old Bottles

In New Life, Old Bottles: Regulating First-Generation Products of Synthetic Biology, Michael Rodemeyer examines the benefits and drawbacks of using the existing U.S. regulatory framework for biotechnology to cover the new products and processes enabled by synthetic biology. The safety of early applications of synthetic biology may be adequately addressed by the existing regulatory framework for biotechnology, especially in contained laboratories and manufacturing facilities, according to the report. But further advances in this emerging field are likely to create significant challenges for U.S. government oversight.

The Future of Health Care and the Independent Vote

Much like the general public, players of Budget Hero are split in their support for the Affordable Care Act, though two years of data from the game suggests many independents are choosing not to repeal the landmark health law and would even support including a government-run option.

Nanotechnology and Public Attitudes

A new study released by the Wilson Center's Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, a project created in partnership with The Pew Charitable Trusts, reveals that while Americans welcome new potential life-saving and -enhancing applications promised by nanotechnology, they voice concern over its potential long-term human health and environmental effects and the ability of government and the private sectors to manage such risks.

Workshop Brings Together Scientists to Discuss Engineered Nanomaterials and Human Health Hazards

On April 6-7, 2006, the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, Rice University, the International Council On Nanotechnology (ICON) and Environmental Defense co-sponsored a workshop on engineered nanomaterials and human health hazards.

Commons Lab

Rapidly evolving information and communication technologies, including social media and mobile phones, coupled with new methodologies like crowdsourcing, have placed the collective “wisdom of the crowd” and power of mass collaboration into the hands of average citizens and organizations. STIP’s Commons Lab seeks to advance research and independent policy analysis of these emerging technologies, with an emphasis on their social, legal, and ethical implications. The initiative does not advocate for or against specific technological platforms, rather works to ensure that these technologies are developed and used in a way that maximizes benefits while reducing risks and unintended consequences. Our work often focuses on novel governance options at the “edges” where the crowd and social media operate –between formal and informal organizations and proprietary and open-source models of data ownership and access. For more information, please see: http://www.CommonsLab.wilsoncenter.org.

Research Needs and Priorities Related to the Environmental, Health, and Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanoscale Materials

Testimony by Andrew D. Maynard, Ph.D.Chief Science Advisor Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies

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Upcoming Events

Complexity and the Art of Public Policy

September 12, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm

Experts & Staff