Asia Program

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Japan at a Nuclear Crossroads

Mar 12, 2012
One year after the tsunami and disaster at Fukushima, Nobuo Fukuda examines Japan's political culture and the close ties between government energy regulators and nuclear power companies that are standing in the way of public opposition to nuclear power.

Japan Earthquake Anniversary

Mar 09, 2012
Asia Program Associate Bryce Wakefield assesses coverage of the anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami.

Growing gulf in Afghanistan

Mar 09, 2012
The rapidly deteriorating situation in Afghanistan has thrown America’s exit plan into peril, casting doubts on whether an orderly withdrawal from the war-torn country is still possible.

India and the US Pivot to Asia

Mar 06, 2012
The US strategic plan is to continue providing global security with emphasis on “rebalance toward the Asia-Pacific region.” Such a pivot is not new, but has been in play since the end of the Cold War, argues Robert M. Hathaway, director of the Asia Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. The strategy requires a long-term partnership with India, as an economic and security anchor in the region. Priorities for both countries vary, particularly in regard to China, leading to divisions within each country as well. Many in India do not want their nation to take part in any Sino-American cold war or conflict and accuse the US of ignoring shenanigans from Pakistan. Indians are also wary about US plans to withdraw troops from Afghanistan and the likely resulting chaos. Both countries have conservatives who oppose reliance on partnerships and agreements that could constrain their military. Ultimately, Hathaway concludes, strength of nations as global actors depends on ensuring economic security and meeting domestic challenges. – YaleGlobal

UN—Not U.S.—Should Take Lead on Talks to Stabilize Afghanistan

Feb 28, 2012
The UN—not the U.S.—is better-suited to manage regional talks on Afghanistan, since important parties like Russia, Iran, and Pakistan view it as a more neutral broker, Wilson Center expert Dennis Kux says. The UN should appoint a special representative to coordinate talks.

Civilian Assistance to Pakistan: Cure or Curse?

Feb 13, 2012
Has civilian assistance to Pakistan over the past three decades assisted with development and improvements in living standards? Or has well-intended aid had a negative impact on Pakistan? The publication of the Wilson Center report Aiding Without Abetting: Making U.S. Civilian Assistance to Pakistan Work for Both Sides provided the London School of Economics with an opportunity to discuss these and related issues. This February 2, 2012, public event in London was co-hosted by the British Pakistan Foundation and LSE’s Asia Research Center.

Taiwan to Hold Pivotal Elections on January 14

Jan 17, 2012
A commentary on the January 14 elections in Taiwan by East Asia Program Associate Bryce Wakefield.

Taiwan Elections: China, U.S. Relations Loom as Nation Prepares to Vote

Jan 11, 2012
On January 14th, voters in Taiwan will choose their next president from a field that includes the country's first ever female candidate. Regional expert Bryce Wakefield discusses the dynamics of the race and the factors likely to decide the outcome.

The U.S. Should Not Abandon Pakistan

Jan 10, 2012
Robert M. Hathaway argues that the US must not abandon efforts in Pakistan. He instead recommends continued economic aid, directed and monitored by skilled technical experts, with Pakistani co-investment and emphasis on job growth.

The First Visit to Burma by an American Secretary of State

Dec 19, 2011
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s visit last month to Burma (Myanmar) broke new ground in Washington’s often tortuous relationship with that country. Wilson Center Fellow Kenton Clymer reminds us that Clinton was not the first secretary of state to make a surprise trip to Burma. Clymer is a Distinguished Research Professor of History at Northern Illinois University.

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