Asia Program

Publications

Going Beyond Nuclear: New energy security realities for Japan and the United States

The Fukushima nuclear meltdown has forced Japan to reconsider its energy policy, and as the country continues to grapple with the aftermath of the crisis triggered by the March 2011 earthquake, public opinion remains deeply divided about the country’s future energy policy including nuclear power. The United States, too, is facing its own challenges, as a bonanza in natural gas within its borders in recent years is redefining the meaning of energy independence. How both countries are looking beyond petroleum to meet their respective energy needs, and prospects for alternative energy sources including nuclear power, were the topics of discussion at the latest Japan-U.S. Joint Public Policy Forum, held in Tokyo on October 31, 2012. About 150 energy experts and policymakers from both the United States and Japan took part in the day-long conference entitled The Future of Energy: Choices for Japan and the United States, which was the fourth annual conference held jointly by the Sasakawa Peace Foundation and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. While the starting point of the conference was the consequences of the nuclear fallout as a result of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan in March 2011, discussions ranged far beyond Japan’s nuclear prospects, as conference participants agreed that Japan’s energy future could not be seriously discussed without continual reference to the global political as well as economic landscape.

A Time For Change?: Japan's "Peace" Constitution at 65

Constitutional revision is a perennial topic in Japanese political discussion, with Article 9—which renounces war and the threat or use of force as a means of settling international disputes—subject to particularly vigorous debate. This new Asia Program publication asks whether it’s not “A Time for Change” for Japan’s “Peace Constitution.”

Taiwan's Energy Conundrum

This Special Report explores the complex set of opportunities and challenges inherent in Taiwan’s energy profile. Ssu-li Chang describes the profile, and also considers the possible impact of changed pricing mechanisms and increased reliance on nuclear energy. Herng-Shinn Hwang, outlines the promise of alternative “green” energies. Chi-yuan Liang surveys Taiwan’s energy security, comparing Taiwan’s performance in energy usage with major nations around the world. And Hongyi Lai examines the possibility of energy cooperation and the potential consequences on the island’s energy supply of conflict between Taiwan and mainland China.

Aiding Without Abetting: Making Civilian Assistance Work for Both Sides

A new Wilson Center report, “Aiding Without Abetting: Making U.S. Civilian Assistance to Pakistan Work for Both Sides," is the culmination of a year-long working group convened to reevaluate the Kerry-Lugar-Berman Act. What can be done to salvage KLB before the U.S. civilian assistance program is deemed a failure?

Looking Forward: U.S.-Japan Economic Partnership in the Post-Lehman World

A report on a December 2010 conference in Tokyo organized by the Asia Program and the Sasakawa Peace Foundation (SPF) convening experts from Japan and the United States to discuss the implications of the 2008 global financial crisis.

The Japan-U.S. Partnership Toward a World Free of Nuclear Weapons

This summary of the Japan-U.S. Joint Public Policy Forum, held in Tokyo in October 2009, discusses the U.S.-Japan bilateral alliance and issues relating to non-proliferation and moving toward a world free of nuclear weapons. The Forum was co-sponsored by the Wilson Center’s Asia Program and the Sasakawa Peace Foundation. This report includes transcripts of keynote speeches by Japan’s former Permanent Representative to the United Nations Yukio Satoh and the former U.S. Secretary of Defense William J. Perry.

Running on Empty: Pakistan's Water Crisis

In a nation facing many challenges, Pakistan’s crisis of water resources stands out. This publication, edited by Asia Program associate Michael Kugelman and director Robert M. Hathaway, examines the rural and urban manifestations of Pakistan’s water problems, and offers recommendations to alleviate the country’s widespread water stress.

Going Global: Chinese Oil and Mining Companies and the Governance of Resource Wealth

Senior Scholar Jill Shankleman conducted a six-month research project to examine the impact of China's oil and mining companies' overseas expansion on the governance of resource wealth.
Afghanistan and Pakistan:  Conflict, Extremism, and Resistance to Modernity by Riaz Mohammad Khan

Afghanistan and Pakistan: Conflict, Extremism, and Resistance to Modernity

This timely study surveys the conflict in Afghanistan from Pakistan’s point of view and analyzes the roots of Pakistan’s ambiguous policy—supporting the United States on one hand and showing empathy for the Afghan Taliban on the other. 

So Much Aid, So Little Development: Stories from Pakistan by Samia Altaf

So Much Aid, So Little Development: Stories from Pakistan

Pakistan has received more than $20 billion in external development assistance but has made little evident improvement in its social indicators. So Much Aid, So Little Development offers a fresh explanation for this outcome.

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Experts & Staff