Public Health Democracy: U.S. and Global Health Disparities in Breast Cancer

Issues in this Series

Public Health Democracy: U.S. and Global Health Disparities in Breast Cancer

Doris Browne
Despite significant scientific advances in cancer research, not all segments of the U.S. population have benefited from this progress. A closer look at cancer rates for racial and ethnic groups reveals significant differences in incidence, mortality, and survival that constitute health disparities. This report is intended to increase understanding of cancer-related health disparities in African American and African women, highlighting specific global problem areas in breast cancer. Ultimately, it presents possible solutions to breast cancer challenges that would improve the lives of African American and minority women at risk for breast cancer in the United States and globally.

Experts & Staff

  • Roger-Mark De Souza // Director of Population, Environmental Security and Resilience, Wilson Center
  • Sandeep Bathala // Senior Program Associate, Environmental Change and Security Program, Maternal Health Initiative
  • Katrina Braxton // Program Assistant, Maternal Health Initiative
  • Schuyler Null // Web Editor and Writer/Editor, Environmental Change and Security Program, Maternal Health Initiative