Special Report: Population, Development, and Environment in Ethiopia

By
Sahlu Haile

Ethiopia has been synonymous with disastrous famine since the 1980s. In the years since, drought and famine have continued to plague the country, and scholars and practitioners have sought to analyze the causes and mitigate the consequences. Population growth is one of the most critical drivers shaping the country’s future, as its social infrastructure and agricultural land are unable to support its growing numbers, and thus many Ethiopians remain trapped in a vicious cycle of poverty, disease, and hunger. The key to achieving sustainable growth lies in reducing the rate of population growth, managing the environment, and building the platform for development.

Experts & Staff

  • Roger-Mark De Souza // Director of Population, Environmental Security and Resilience, Wilson Center
  • Sandeep Bathala // Senior Program Associate, Environmental Change and Security Program, Maternal Health Initiative
  • Katharine Diamond // Program Assistant, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Benjamin Dills // Program Assistant, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Lauren Herzer // Program Associate, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • John Thon Majok // Program Associate, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Schuyler Null // Web Editor and Writer/Editor, Environmental Change and Security Program, Maternal Health Initiative
  • Meaghan Parker // Writer/Editor, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Sean Peoples // Multimedia Producer and Program Associate, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Geoffrey D. Dabelko // Senior Advisor, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Ruth Greenspan Bell // Public Policy Scholar
  • William Krist // Senior Policy Scholar
  • Louise Lief // Public Policy Scholar
  • John W. Sewell // Senior Scholar