China Mainland Publications

Snapshot: China's Waste Challenge

Nov 19, 2012
Every year, China generates 250 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW), or one quarter of the world’s total annual waste.To help deal with this problem, 155 incineration facilities currently operate in China, with an expected 300 facilities to be online by 2015. However, these plants vary drastically in their ability to control pollution and toxic waste from China’s incinerators is occasionally dumped into ponds or landfilled, belying the clean and renewable image promoted by the government. For citizens troubled by a lack of information from the government about incineration plants before and during construction, NGOs and grassroots organizations serve to fill the gap as sources of information, legal services, and advice. more

Redefining U.S. Economic Rivalries in Asia

Nov 19, 2012
Promising to level the playing field with China has been a vote-winning mantra among Democrats and Republicans alike. Yet competition for new markets, natural resources, good jobs, and global talent is as likely to come from Japan and South Korea as from China. more

Policy Brief: Dealing with a Rising China

Nov 15, 2012
Washington and Beijing both consider good bilateral relations to be vital, but their growing strategic rivalry has the potential to evolve into mutual antagonism. In this new policy brief, published as the new leadership was announced in Beijing, China expert Stapleton Roy argues that the US should focus on regional engagement through multilateral organizations like ASEAN, as opposed to its military presence in the region. more

Kite Sensorship: Regulating China’s Airways

Oct 26, 2012
Launched in July 2012, FLOAT Beijing—a community art project that utilizes citizen science—offers a simple, innovative, and non-confrontational approach to air quality monitoring: kites. Pioneered by two U.S. graduate students, the project tracks air pollutants using air sensor modules attached to kites. more

Recent Trends in the Study of Cold War History in China

Oct 23, 2012
The first in a series of Occasional Papers published through the ECNU-WWICS Cold War Studies Initiative, "Recent Trends" surveys the most up-to-date scholarship on the Cold War being produced by Chinese scholars and argues that the study of Cold War history in China has continued to evolve and improve over the last decade and particularly over the last five years. more

Explaining North Korean Migration to China

Sep 26, 2012
NKIDP e-Dossier no. 11, "Explaining North Korean Migration to China," is introduced by Hazel Smith and features 11 translated Chinese documents which provide a window into historical cases of legal and illegal migration between the DPRK and China. more

Sustaining U.S.-China Cooperation in Clean Energy

Sep 24, 2012
Sustaining U.S.-China Cooperation in Clean Energy provides a governmental and private-sector overview of the complex dynamics of competition and cooperation behind U.S. and Chinese national efforts to develop their solar, wind, and other alternative energy industries. It assesses systemic differences in clean energy policy between the United States and China and identifies areas of congruence as well as disparity. more

Zhou Enlai and China's Response to the Korean War

Jun 22, 2012
NKIDP e-Dossier No. 9, "Zhou Enlai and China's Response to the Korean War," is introduced by Charles Kraus and includes 34 translations of Chinese documents which open a new chapter in the diplomatic and military history of the Korean War. more

China and the Post-War Reconstruction of North Korea, 1953-1961

May 30, 2012
NKIDP Working Paper #4, “China and the Post-War Reconstruction of North Korea, 1953-1961,” written by Zhihua Shen and Yafeng Xia, is the first paper in English to systematically assess the extent and significance of Chinese assistance to North Korea after the Korean War. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.