Democracy Publications

Pursuing A Productive Relationship Between the U.S. and Brazil

Dec 03, 2012
The growing presence of Brazilian global companies in the United States complements traditionally strong investments by U.S. companies in Brazil. This trend has created a two-way street where common interests are more visible and both governments are pressured to recognize the benefits of working together or risk paying a political price for not doing so. more

The Demons Besieging Lebanon: Iran’s Tighter Grip

Nov 26, 2012
Hezbollah’s main strength in Lebanon is not its weaponry. Its real backbone is its popular support, which guarantees Hezbollah’s control over state institutions. Iran may be prepared to lose Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, but it is certainly not ready to lose Lebanon. Now that Hezbollah’s popular support in Lebanon is waning, Iran will do whatever it takes to overcome the results of Lebanon's parliamentary elections in 2013. more

A 21st Century Vision for U.S. Global Media

Nov 15, 2012
Drawing on past work supported by the Cold War International History Program, the A. Ross Johnson and R. Eugene Parta apply lessons from successful U.S. international broadcasting during the Cold War to today’s transformed geopolitical, media, and technological world. They suggest a restatement of mission and corresponding organizational changes to ensure that international broadcasting remains an effective instrument of U.S. soft power – one supporting freedom and democracy abroad in the national interest. more

Venezuela’s Presidential Elections 2012

Sep 19, 2012
The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Latin American Program and IDEA Internacional commissioned two renowned Latin American experts with vast knowledge of and experience with electoral processes, Dr. José Woldenberg and Dr. Genaro Arriagada to visit Venezuela and prepare a report as the presidential elections in Venezuela approach. more

International Support for Justice Reform in Latin America: Worthwhile or Worthless?

Aug 31, 2012
This paper examines international support for judicial reform in Latin America, exploring several questions. more

The Arab Awakening is Democracy a Mirage?

The Arab Awakening: Is Democracy a Mirage?

Aug 10, 2012
On June 20, 2012, the Wilson Center’s Middle East Program hosted a meeting on “The Arab Awakening: Is Democracy a Mirage?” This publication brings together the talks presented at the meeting. more

In the Wake of War: Democratization and Internal Armed Conflict in Latin America

Aug 09, 2012
In the Wake of War assesses the consequences of civil war for democratization in Latin America, focusing on questions of state capacity. Contributors focus on seven countries—Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru—where state weakness fostered conflict and the task of state reconstruction presents multiple challenges. more

A Time For Change?: Japan's "Peace" Constitution at 65

Jul 03, 2012
Constitutional revision is a perennial topic in Japanese political discussion, with Article 9—which renounces war and the threat or use of force as a means of settling international disputes—subject to particularly vigorous debate. This new Asia Program publication asks whether it’s not “A Time for Change” for Japan’s “Peace Constitution.” more

In the Wake of War: Democratization and Internal Armed Conflict in Latin America, edited by Cynthia J. Arnson

In the Wake of War: Democratization and Internal Armed Conflict in Latin America

May 29, 2012
In the Wake of War assesses the consequences of civil war for democratization in Latin America, focusing on questions of state capacity. Contributors focus on seven countries—Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru—where state weakness fostered conflict and the task of state reconstruction presents multiple challenges.  more

The Islamists Are Coming: Who They Really Are, edited by Robin Wright

The Islamists Are Coming: Who They Really Are

Apr 26, 2012
The Islamists Are Coming is the first book to survey the rise of Islamist groups in the wake of the Arab Spring. Often lumped together, the more than 50 Islamist parties with millions of followers now constitute a whole new spectrum—separate from either militants or secular parties. They will shape the new order in the world’s most volatile region more than any other political bloc. Yet they have diverse goals and different constituencies. Sometimes they are even rivals. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.