Economics and Globalization Publications

A Better Way to Fund the Government on Time

Sep 20, 2011
Congress will not celebrate fiscal new year’s eve Sept. 30. That’s because: (a) it will not be in town; and (b) it will have nothing to celebrate. more

Mixed Records of Success for Joint Committees

Sep 06, 2011
If a camel is a horse designed by a committee, is a duck-billed platypus a duck conceived by a bipartisan, joint committee of Congress? We may soon know, as the Joint Committee on Deficit Reduction is mandated to report additional budget savings of at least $1.5 trillion over the next decade by Nov. 23. more

Debt Deal Shows How Process Becomes Policy

Aug 02, 2011
If you got the impression during the debt limit imbroglio that our leaders were creatively trying to extricate themselves from a box of their own making, you’ve been cribbing from Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s manual: Crises (fabricated or not) can advance worthy goals—even restoring fiscal sanity. It’s getting there that sometimes seems insane. more

The Cuban Economy: Recent Trends

Aug 01, 2011
This publication examines the contemporary state of Cuba’s economy at a time of great transformation through the use of econometric and other macroeconomic analysis tools. more

Certification: The Path to Conflict-Free Minerals from Congo

Jul 21, 2011
The conflict minerals movement is gaining traction. The movement is a pragmatic effort to address one of the principal drivers of atrocities and conflict throughout Congo’s tortured history: the scramble for control of Congo's vast mineral resources. In eastern Congo today, these mineral resources are financing multiple armed groups, many of whom use mass rape as a deliberate strategy to intimidate and control local populations. Armed groups and military units earn hundreds of millions of dollars per year by trading four main minerals: the ores that produce tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold. This money enables the militias to self-finance their campaign of brutal violence against civilians, with some of the worst abuses occurring in mining areas. more

Trade & Economic Development

Jul 14, 2011
This paper is intended to promote discussion as to the role that trade can play in speeding development in Africa and the possible steps that can be taken to enable Africa to participate more fully in the global market. It does not cover all the barriers to expanding trade by African countries. Other important topics – notably infrastructure, especially ports and roads, and corruption – are discussed in other conference papers. It also does not include issues that are not directly related to trade and which can only be dealt with in the longer term, such as improved health and education, which were critical components of the success of the Asian “tigers”. more

Pilfering the Peace: The Nexus Between Corruption and Peacebuilding

Jul 12, 2011
How might the best practices of peacebuilding be applied to anti-corruption? Based on interviews with trainers and staff of the Burundi Leadership Training Programme (BLTP) of the Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars, this article explores possible answers to that question in light of a successful peacebuilding effort. The author also flags ideas for future projects and research at the nexus of the two fields.  more

Issue 22: Coffee and Community: Combining Agribusiness and Health in Rwanda

Jul 12, 2011
Author Irene Kitzantides describes the SPREAD Project's integration of agribusiness development with community health care and education, including family planning, in Rwanda. more

Looking Forward: U.S.-Japan Economic Partnership in the Post-Lehman World

Jul 12, 2011
A report on a December 2010 conference in Tokyo organized by the Asia Program and the Sasakawa Peace Foundation (SPF) convening experts from Japan and the United States to discuss the implications of the 2008 global financial crisis. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.