Economics and Globalization Publications

Hong Kong Conference Report: Sections 2-4 (English)

Jul 07, 2011
Includes sections on NGO networking and partnering; environmental education methods; and building the capacity of green NGOs. more

ECSP Report 12

Jul 07, 2011
ECSP Report 12 analyzes conflicts over natural resources, which are increasingly depleted by population growth, environmental degradation, poverty, and over-consumption. Complete report. more

Poverty, Inequality and the New Left in Latin America

Jul 07, 2011
This is a research paper commissioned for the conference, by Argentine economist Nora Lustig, who provides an overview of trends in poverty and inequality throughout Latin America, comparing left and non-left governments, as well as left governments and their non-leftist predecessors in their own countries. more

Commentary: Should Global Poverty be a U.S. National Security Issue? (Part 2)

Jul 07, 2011
ECSP invited analysts to address whether global poverty should and can be a U.S. national security issue (Part 2). more

ECSP Report 7: Special Reports

Jul 07, 2011
Two special reports: The Linkages Between Population and Water: Forthcoming Articles from ECSP, and Environmental Mission Recommendations for the U.S. Intelligence Community. more

ECSP Report 6: Update and Bibliography

Jul 07, 2011
The update section is designed to highlight the environment, population, and security activities of various organizations. The bibliography includes a wide range of publications, organized by theme, which relate to environment, population, and security. more

137. Troubled Economic Transitions In The Yugoslav Successor States

Jul 07, 2011
May 1997 - The successor states to the former Yugoslavia may be unanimous in their opposition to any political project even hinting at its recreation, but they still face a set of surprisingly common economic problems. (On the emergence of the successor states from the collapse of Yugoslavia, see Yugoslavia and After: A Study in Fragmentation, Despair, and Rebirth, edited by David A. Dyker and Ivan Vojvoda [New York: Longman, 1996].) For one, there is the obvious absence of the economic boom that a postwar recovery period often generates. As a partial solution, business enterprises are turning back toward their nearest neighbors, their former compatriots. Even this movement faces two further problems. First, their transitions to a market economy based on private enterprise are in the best case half-finished and have in the worst cases created new vested interests grounded in political power and corruption. Second, while private entrepreneurship has indeed grown apace, its enterprises are typically too small or too closely linked to political or outright criminal networks to press effectively, from below, for a legal market framework. more

Conflict and Cooperation: Making the Case for Environmental Pathways to Peacebuilding in the Great Lakes Region

Jul 07, 2011
This brief examines the possibility of using environmental management as a pathway to peace in the Great Lakes Region. more

Escaping the Resource Curse

Jul 07, 2011
This edited volume, in which leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers focus on overcoming the problems faced by states endowed with large oil and gas reserves, could not have come at a better time. more

140. Bosnian Economic Prospects and The Dayton Process After 1997

Jul 07, 2011
September 1997 - Nearly a decade after the end of the Cold War (black resigned, in the chess parlance chosen by one Hungarian observer), the issues in Eastern Europe are not black and white, but neither are they a uniform shade of grey. They are different shades and degrees of grey in which the security issues confronting the United States and the NATO alliance, especially an enlarged alliance, are likely to be defined from now on. For anyone unwilling to face these complexities, especially in a situation where all parties see the United States as the only decisive external force, "let them come to Bosnia." more

Pages

Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.